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March 16, 2020

Webinar Recap: The Key Metrics of Online Reputation Management 

By: Kieran McQuilkin

Everyone knows a healthy online reputation is valuable to successful businesses. But how valuable is it, exactly? Binary Fountain leaders Aaron Clifford, Andrew Rainey and Chase Ausley tackle that question every day for clients. For our latest webinar, they gathered for a roundtable discussion about the return on investment (ROI) for online reputation management (ORM). The trio talked about the competitive…

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metrics-reputation-managementEveryone knows a healthy online reputation is valuable to successful businesses. But how valuable is it, exactly?

Binary Fountain leaders Aaron Clifford, Andrew Rainey and Chase Ausley tackle that question every day for clients. For our latest webinar, they gathered for a roundtable discussion about the return on investment (ROI) for online reputation management (ORM).

The trio talked about the competitive landscape, setting goals, key metrics to analyze and other contributors to ROI that will help you get the most out of your online reputation.

Here are some of the questions they cover:

  • What are the key metrics for my enterprise-wide reputation management strategy, and what is their impact on my bottom line?
  • How do I connect online reputation metrics to business objectives when seeking executive buy-in?
  • How do I measure ongoing success for my healthcare company’s investment in reputation management? How do I calculate ROI?

Here are some key takeaways:

On how to frame your thinking about what to invest in ORM:

There are three main categories you should consider from the outset: Your current website metrics and online presence, the patient experience (which dictates the feedback you get online), and how you manage patient feedback. If you’re improving the areas within those categories that are subpar, it will be reflected online and it could improve patient acquisition.

Equally important to tracking those metrics is identifying team leads who will manage the project. That includes buy-in at the health system level, but also applies to the business’ executive leadership, who would be benefiting from an ORM program.

On the key metrics to track for your enterprise-wide ORM strategy:

Some of the important metrics are obvious: When you search for your brand online, where do you show up? Even with five-star ratings across all your facilities, if you don’t show up on search, you don’t exist to the consumer. The volume of reviews and recency of reviews are important signals for guiding consumer behavior and choice – apply those trends to your healthcare organization.

It’s also critical to understand where patients are looking when they require care, and to have a healthy presence on all those sites. When shopping on Amazon, consumers are more confident in a product with star ratings than those without. Today, consumers have the same viewpoint when searching for healthcare.

On attracting buy-in or budget for a new strategic initiative:

The critical mass of the healthcare market has realized that reputation management is simply a cost of doing business. Everyone must invest in ORM to some degree – the question is where you invest and where you don’t.

Most importantly, it’s critical to understand how different variables affect the volume of net new patients and loyalty from existing patients. Many different inputs contribute, such as online presence, digital accessibility and star ratings. If you have laid out your success metrics before launching your program, there will be no surprises: You already baked in the program’s alignment with business objectives.

On connecting reputation management to revenue generation:

Especially in healthcare, knowing service line revenue is vital. Choose the most valuable service lines and the health system’s goals for those services, focus on those service lines, and report those results frequently.

Choose your participating providers wisely, too. It’s challenging for healthcare organizations to market providers who are at maximum patient capacity. While it’s important to have coverage for loyalty, your ORM strategy should focus more on physicians with the capacity to bring in more patients. Otherwise, you won’t see the lift in new patient revenue.

For more insights and advice, click here to watch the on-demand webinar. 

For more on the ROI of reputation management, check out these articles:

About the Author

Kieran McQuilkin
Content Marketing Specialist

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March 13, 2020

Coronavirus: What Consumers, Patients, and Caregivers are Saying Online and How Healthcare Organizations Can Respond

By: Kieran McQuilkin

In this article, you will learn:  Where consumers are posting online about coronavirus and frequently asked questions  What consumers are saying about healthcare organizations related to COVID-19  How to monitor patient feedback and social media for coronavirus-related mentions of your brand  The emergence and spread of coronavirus is weighing heavily on the healthcare industry, as care providers scramble to answer a flood of questions from patients and community…

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coronavirus-map-march
A map of U.S. coronavirus cases as of March 13, 2020. Credit: CSSE at JHU

In this article, you will learn: 

  • Where consumers are posting online about coronavirus and frequently asked questions 
  • What consumers are saying about healthcare organizations related to COVID-19 
  • How to monitor patient feedback and social media for coronavirus-related mentions of your brand 

The emergence and spread of coronavirus is weighing heavily on the healthcare industry, as care providers scramble to answer a flood of questions from patients and community members. 

As a consumer experience and patient feedback management platform, we know those questions are coming quickly and from many directions. To help you navigate this difficult situation, we hope to provide resources and tools to keep your business operating smoothly. 

In this article, we will offer guidance on what consumers are saying about coronavirus and how to use the Binary Fountain platform to update the public with key information. To do so, we collected data on common coronavirus inquiries and consumer feedback and outlined steps toward providing a quality consumer experience and protecting your brand during this crisis. 

What Healthcare Consumers Are Saying About Coronavirus Online 

Search terms, social media posts and patient feedback mentioning coronavirus (COVID-19) are spiking, with comments and questions about potential symptoms, preventative measures, where the virus is spreading and where to find care in a worst-case scenario. 

When considering which feedback platforms to monitor, start with Twitter. Binary Fountain clients using Binary Health Analytics have amassed thousands of mentions of the virus connected to their brand on the social media site (including retweets). As the newsiest of the social media giants, Twitter topics related to coronavirus most frequently involve notifications about new cases, community updates from healthcare providers and links to informational content. 

Meanwhile, healthcare organizations using Binary Fountain’s Social Listening tool have been mentioned alongside coronavirus in hundreds of Facebook comments and posts on Facebook business profiles. The most common Facebook mentions of the virus include questions about providers’ preparedness, provider reviews about flu-like symptom treatment, and concerns about process changes brought on by facilities’ preventative measures. 

They aren’t all bad: One children’s hospital received a Facebook comment in which grandparents of someone who recovered from coronavirus thanked the organization for treating their grandsonOther frequent comments on Facebook offer prevention advice, share news articles and link to resources like the CDC coronavirus site. 

While those are the most popular platforms in terms of COVID-19 mentions, you should also check third-party review sites and Google listingsThey attract fewer comments related to the virus, but for Binary Fountain clients, most of those messages are more detailed – mostly describing patient experiences while being examined for flu-like symptoms. 

Using Binary Fountain to Track Coronavirus Mentions 

Hospitals and clinics across the U.S. will benefit from monitoring reviews, surveys and other feedback for mentions of coronavirus paired with their brand. To manage the flood of information, healthcare organizations are using consumer experience technologies like Binary Fountain to help automate and streamline that process. 

On the Binary Health Analytics dashboard, healthcare organizations can filter their patient feedback across all platforms using specific keywords like “coronavirus symptoms, “COVID-19” and “coronaviridae.” With patients expecting swift answers from their local providers, technology platforms are allowing these organizations to instantly qualm consumers’ worries, no matter where nor how they express those concerns. 

Mentions of COVID-19 on Google reviews and Google Q&A are less frequent than on social media. However, anticipating questions from consumers and posting them to those listings can prevent an influx of FAQs and save time for your staff. If consumers have already asked questions about coronavirus on your Google My Business listings, respond quickly and empathetically to their concerns. 

Our healthcare clients are seeing increased feedback about changed operating hours, updated service offerings and closed facilities due to precautionary measures. If you need to close locations, temporarily suspend specific services or make other changes, you can update your facilities’ data inside the Binary Health Analytics platform so updates flow immediately to any listings powered by Binary Fountain 

Your organization should also closely monitor social media mentions and post proactive messages on social media, keeping the public aware of the situation at your facilities and in the community. Binary Fountain’s Social Media Management tools are being used by healthcare organizations ttrack mentions of coronavirus in relation to their brandpublish informational posts across all their social media profiles, and respond to comments and reviews in real-time. 

Here is an example of a helpful social media post distributed by a healthcare brand across multiple platforms:  

[Healthcare organization] is screening for the 2019 coronavirus (COVID-19) at all sites. If you suspect that you or someone in your family may be at risk for coronavirus, we ask that you wear a mask prior to entering a [healthcare organization] site to help ensure patient safety. Masks can be found at the entrance of each location. Learn more below.” 

More Healthcare Resources for COVID-19 Preparation 

Though much is still unknown about COVID-19, its transmission dynamics, and its treatments, there are numerous resources available to stay well informed. 

The World Health Organization (WHO)  has assembled several resources around the topic of coronavirus, which you can find here. It also developed free online training courses for healthcare workers and created checklists for provider risk communications and community engagement. 

The CDC suggests a cautious approach to persons under investigation (PUI) for COVID-19, recommending that healthcare personnel evaluating PUI or providing care for patients with confirmed COVID-19 should use Standard Precautions, Contact Precautions, Airborne Precautions, and use eye protection. Providers should also consult with local or state health departments to determine whether patients meet criteria for a PUI, and should immediately notify infection control personnel at their facility if they suspect the virus in a patient. You can find more CDC coronavirus information here. 

In addition to the WHO and CDC resources, Johns Hopkins created an interactive map that tracks (in real-time) the spread of coronavirus in the U.S. and globally. 

We wish you and your teams the best during this critical moment for the healthcare industryWe are here to help your patient experience teams and marketing operations with anything you need, so please reach out with any questions or concerns.

About the Author

Kieran McQuilkin
Content Marketing Specialist

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March 12, 2020

Top Healthcare Marketing Newsletters and Blogs for Busy Medical Professionals

By: Kieran McQuilkin

Healthcare marketing is busy work. With large brand reputations and sensitive medical information on the line, there’s little time left to stay on top of news and trends that influence perceptions of your brand. Though the medical marketing industry constantly changes – whether it’s Google algorithms, Facebook ad policies or best practices for video –…

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binary-fountain-healthcare-marketing-newslettersHealthcare marketing is busy work. With large brand reputations and sensitive medical information on the line, there’s little time left to stay on top of news and trends that influence perceptions of your brand.

Though the medical marketing industry constantly changes – whether it’s Google algorithms, Facebook ad policies or best practices for video – the information is out there. To keep your content, campaigns and messaging on point, and sent through the right channels, you need updated information on search trends and patient feedback.

If you’re looking for how-to’s, industry insights, or that small dose of inspiration to write your next blog post or tweet, we’re here to help. Here are some of the best healthcare marketing newsletters and blogs that every medical marketer should read.

Becker’s Hospital Review, Becker’s

For up-to-date information on the healthcare industry and changing regulations, Becker’s Hospital Review is a mainstay. Becker’s offers several publications and newsletters to supply the news you need, including weekly emails devoted to business and legal news, CFO reports, and infection control and patient experience.

PX Weekly, The Beryl Institute

The Beryl Institute’s Patient Experience Weekly publication shares newsworthy events, resources and information designed to inform your work in the healthcare industry. It aims to be a leading resource for ongoing learning for patient experience professionals and healthcare leaders. The Beryl Institute’s periodic emails also announce new white papers, new issues of its Patient Experience Journal and event-specific communications for PX gatherings around the U.S.

MM&M Weekly Digest, Medical Marketing and Media

MM&M delivers a consistent roundup of the week’s big stories, hires and other developments in healthcare marketing, along with its own special reports. The timely editorial content is aimed at an executive audience in pharmaceuticals, medical devices and diagnostics, along with the industry at large. MM&M also produces annual lists like the Top 40 Healthcare Transformers and the Hall of Femme, as well as surveys with data on industry salaries and marketing trends.

Healthcare Success Marketing Advisor, Healthcare Success

The Healthcare Success Marketing Advisor newsletter does not fall short of information, with high-level topics that relate to the healthcare economy. As a healthcare marketing and medical advertising agency, Healthcare Success focuses its publications on growing your hospital or physician practice. Subscribing to the newsletter also grants you access to a useful ebook: “How to Avoid the 7 Deadly Sins of Healthcare Marketing.”

TPS Report, Touch Point Media

For a dose of video in your market research, check out the TPS Report newsletter from Touch Point Media. The podcast publishing company focuses exclusively on healthcare, with several shows on the topic, including “The Connected Hospital” and “Power of the Patient.” Every week, Touch Point sends an email with links to articles that inspire its shows and their hosts, along with industry news and recent podcast episodes.

Socialease, Health Care Social Media

Every week, public relations practitioner Marie Ennis-O’Connor sends a list of the latest social media news to help healthcare-focused marketing specialists stay up to date with industry-specific social media marketing. Ennis-O’Connor’s resume and writing style make her a must-read for the industry’s social media managers – she serves on the external advisory board of the Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media, and on the board of trustees for the Patient Empowerment Foundation.

Health Care Communication News, Ragan

Ragan’s Health Care Communication News is one of the leading publishers regarding communication for healthcare professionals. It delivers news and strategies to promote and publicize your providers through immersive storytelling. Ragan also provides frequent information on internal communications for healthcare organizations, including viewpoints from both marketing experts and patients. Topics on the site run the gamut, from basic marketing tips to data analytics and HIPAA compliance.

HIMSS News, Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society

With a laser-focus on marketing in health technology, the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) is among the premier health IT information sources. The blog stays on top of technological disruptions across the industry, covering emerging solutions for challenges like interoperability, optimizing care delivery and organizational change.

TotalCom Blog, TotalCom Marketing Communications

Alabama-based marketing agency TotalCom Marketing Communications has a knack for finding healthcare clients, giving its blog deep insights into understandable, replicable use cases. Though it’s only updated about once a month, the blog provides case studies and real-world examples of top-notch healthcare marketing in many forms, with topics ranging from breast cancer awareness to rebranding strategies to award announcements.

99MGMT, 99 Healthcare Management

Healthcare management group Ninety Nine Management helps physicians practice medicine independently with increased net revenue, making it a great resource for smaller healthcare operations and individual providers. The blog provides content surrounding practice management, marketing and business growth, with a focus on growing your practice and bottom-line results.

Carevoyance Monthly Digest, Carevoyance

The Carevoyance blog has helpful advice on healthcare marketing strategies, but also keeps readers abreast of technology and industry news. You’ll find posts on several topics, from artificial intelligence in healthcare and geographic targeting to email marketing tips and medical sales cycles.

KevinMD, MedPage Today

Founded in 2004 by Kevin Pho, KevinMD is one of the most popular publications for medical professionals looking to upgrade their online presence. The platform is more democratic than most resources on this list, with physicians, advanced practitioners, nurses, medical students and patients all sharing insights and telling their stories. Though topics range in scope, KevinMD is especially useful for clinicians looking to manage their online reputation, expand their social media know-how or prepare a keynote speech.

Daily Digest, MedCityNews

With information on innovation in healthcare, MedCity News does well to cover timely topics before they find the mainstream. In its publications, you’ll find breaking news alongside business analysis, policy papers and profiles of people that are pushing boundaries in the healthcare industry. A portion of MedCity News content focuses specifically on MedTech for technologically savvy providers and practice managers.

Digital Pulse, Trajectory

As a well-known wellness marketing agency in the Mid-Atlantic, Trajectory specializes in content surrounding branding and content marketing. With coverage on market research, thought leadership and technology, the Digital Pulse blog has resources that can help push your marketing campaigns through the dreaded writer’s block.

Reputation Roundup, Binary Fountain

Get the latest updates on online reputation strategies and listings management from Binary Fountain’s email newsletter. Every three weeks, we’ll send you a list of recent blog posts, case studies and ebooks focused on the world of healthcare marketing. We’ll also let you know about upcoming webinars that you won’t want to miss.

Looking for more healthcare marketing content? Look no further than Binary Fountain’s constantly updated blog posts, case studies and ebooks.

About the Author

Kieran McQuilkin
Content Marketing Specialist

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March 03, 2020

How to Optimize Physician Profile Pages

By: Kieran McQuilkin

With most patients now playing a more active role in their healthcare, physician profile pages or listings are often the first touchpoint on their path to choosing a provider. If you are a practice manager or healthcare marketer, you know how difficult it is to manage physician profile listings online, from Google and Facebook to Healthgrades and…

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physician-profile-pagesWith most patients now playing a more active role in their healthcare, physician profile pages or listings are often the first touchpoint on their path to choosing a provider.

If you are a practice manager or healthcare marketer, you know how difficult it is to manage physician profile listings online, from Google and Facebook to Healthgrades and Wellness.com and more. While these listings are tedious to manage, they play an important role in your provider’s online personal brand.

In addition to third-party review sites, many practices know that creating their own physician profile pages on their website can give your practice a competitive advantage when a patient is choosing a doctor.

If you want to know how to build a high-converting physician profile page, you’ve come to the right place. We’ll walk you through how to optimize physician pages, and in doing so, attract more patients to your practice.

The Basics of a Physician Profile Page

When it comes to physician profile pages, consumers are really trying to answer three questions:

  • Does this physician have the right expertise I need for the highest level of care?
  • Can I contact or get an appointment with this doctor?
  • Can I trust this doctor?

A good physician profile page should answer these questions and be easy to navigate.

To start, you will need to make sure you are covering the physician’s specialty, their previous experience and any accolades they have received.

From there, you will also want to include contact information for the practice and an option to book an appointment online (if your facility offers it). If a doctor is not taking on new patients, you should do the patient (and your front office) a favor by declaring that on the doctor’s profile page. That way, you don’t waste anyone’s time trying to schedule an appointment that won’t happen in the near future. Insert a link to your full physician listings to keep users on your website.

If you can, humanize the physician by including their interests, hobbies or why they chose to be a caregiver. Additionally, use any kinds of photo or video content you can to build the physician up as someone who patients can relate to on a personal level.

Finally, and most importantly, you will want to include verified online reviews on the physician’s page.

Why Star Ratings/Reviews Matter Most

According to BrightLocal, 58% of consumers say that star rating is the most significant factor in them choosing a business. Why? Because according to the same survey, 84% of consumers trust online reviews as much as a personal referral.

Star ratings also matter significantly for your local SEO game, as Google won’t even consider displaying a business in queries containing “best [service/product] in [location],” unless it has a 4-star rating or higher.

A well written review also helps put into context why someone gave that a physician a certain star rating.

In general, patients are looking for these factors when looking at physician profile pages:

  • Number of patient reviews
  • Recency of reviews
  • Overall star rating
  • Bedside manner

If you are creating a physician profile page on your site, make sure you are incorporating physician reviews.

Transparency Matters

When it comes to third-party provider review sites like Healthgrades, Vitals and ZocDoc, it’s important to take all reviews at face value, even the most negative ones. These sites invest significant time in verifying the integrity of their reviewers to ensure the best experience for users and for healthcare providers.

Resist the urge to challenge negative reviews – patients want to see both the positives and negatives about your healthcare providers in order to make an informed decision about their healthcare. Remember: all reviews matter.

Showing verified customer reviews on your physician pages creates transparency and builds trust with potential patients before they visit your location. You won’t regret giving people the clarity they need to select the right healthcare provider for them.

Physician Profile Pages are a Part of Online Reputation Management

Now that you know how to build a great physician profile page, it’s time to get serious about your practice’s online reputation. Designing great profile pages is only the first step to building a great brand online.

At Binary Fountain, we understand how difficult it is to manage and maintain business listings and customer reviews in so many different places. Our reputation management software is perfectly suited for practices because all of your reviews and star ratings can now live in one place.

Our system gives healthcare marketers and practice managers the full picture of what consumers are saying about their practice and providers, all in one unified dashboard.

If you are serious about increasing transparency and patient acquisition, sign up for a free demo or view one of our case studies to learn more about how we can help you grow your business.

About the Author

Kieran McQuilkin
Content Marketing Specialist

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February 28, 2020

Ask an Expert: How to Protect Your Healthcare Company From a Data Breach

By: Kieran McQuilkin

Few things are more personal than health information, and it’s up to healthcare organizations to protect patients from a data breach by keeping it secure. In the digital age, that is easier said than done.  The medical world continues to grapple with stories of stolen data, ransomware and other security threats to health systems. There is…

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data-breach-securityFew things are more personal than health information, and it’s up to healthcare organizations to protect patients from a data breach by keeping it secure. In the digital age, that is easier said than done. 

The medical world continues to grapple with stories of stolen data, ransomware and other security threats to health systems. There is no magic bullet to preventing security breaches, especially with millions of data points stored and transferred electronically. But there are proven tools and processes that minimize your company’s vulnerability.

We asked Mark Beckmeyer, Binary Fountain’s director of IT security, how healthcare organizations can protect themselves from a data breach. Here is his advice:

What implications does a healthcare privacy breach have, that differentiates it from other industries? 

In the black market, protected health information is vastly more valuable than other highly targeted information. The last time I looked, it was about a $20 to $1 ratio – for every $1 you get for credit card information you get $20 for medical information about a person.

One of the reasons it’s so valuable is the personal nature of it, and because financial information can be easily remedied. If your credit card is stolen it could be deactivated right away. Whereas with medical information and PHI, that information is nearly impossible to purge from the black market and, thus, has a much longer shelf life due to its long-lasting usefulness in nefarious schemes.

What are the biggest mistakes healthcare enterprises make with storing and/or transferring protected data? 

The biggest mistake is not knowing where data is internally stored and where and how PHI is being exchanged with other organizations. One of the biggest issues I came across in hospital organizations was senior management lacking knowledge about where their PHI was being used within their environment. It’s essential for those in any data-using roles, from patient experience to accounting to marketing, to know all avenues by which information comes in and out of the organization – and with whom it is shared.

What steps can I take right now to evaluate the security of my organization’s information?

To minimize the possibility of a data breach, the first step is to fully understand the sensitive nature of data that your organization uses or stores. I want to understand how we’re getting information, and if I know it will have PHI in it, is it from a partner of ours or a client? Is this data we’re cultivating ourselves?

The second step is to identify all potential risks to the organization and, third, to test existing safeguards to understand what needs to be fixed. All applicable privacy standards (especially HIPAA) need to be addressed enterprise-wide as well, along with industry best practices for using health data. These steps must be periodically repeated, so all departments across the organization are on board with a risk management program.

Mark Beckmeyer
Mark Beckmeyer

How do I make sure corporate partners and vendors are protecting patient data? 

Understanding the nature of information shared with a partner, such as technology vendors or marketing agencies, will dictate the level of due diligence needed to ensure the appropriate level of protection.

“If the company’s leaders and executive management aren’t committed to security, who in the organization will be?”

If PHI is to be exchanged, the organization must conduct a thorough security assessment of the partner to ensure they are capable of protecting such information. As with your own risk management program, the external entities’ security assessment should be conducted periodically. That requires all departments to keep management abreast of data-sharing partnerships, to make sure they meet certain standards for information security.

How can I best protect my healthcare organization’s data from being lost or stolen? 

Defense and depth. You should look at applying security at multiple layers throughout the environment, from simple card key access on doors and alarms to laptops with access controls, encrypted hard drives, and a comprehensive set of policies and procedures that govern the security program.

Likely the biggest threat for healthcare firms is on the human-error side of security. You can have the best set of policies in the world, but if you don’t train your workforce and can’t push out reminders of procedures, that’s where the biggest threats can occur. The case-in-point is ransomware: One person clicks an attachment and all a sudden it runs rampant throughout your network.

What are the first steps I should take after discovering a privacy breach? 

If a security-related event could jeopardize the protection of the organization’s sensitive information, the first step is communicating it quickly to security teams, who will try to isolate it from other parts of the network. The next thing is to fully understand how much data was exposed, how the incident occurred and how to remediate its root cause.

A very important consideration is to keep senior management informed of the incident status – they play key roles during and after the incident. Such roles include notifications to clients, responding to media inquiries, damage control and government reporting.

If you could give one piece of advice to a healthcare executive worried about their data security, what would it be? 

Make a commitment. Get the right people in there with the experience and skillsets to do what needs to be done. It will take time and effort, cost money and require following additional security policies, but make that commitment and stand by that commitment. If the company’s leaders and executive management aren’t committed to security, who in the organization will be?

Another overarching bit of advice I would give – and this is important – is to not be satisfied with just compliance. No matter your role at a healthcare firm, don’t just stop at HIPAA compliance. Understand, embrace and go boldly into the realm of best practices for security and privacy.

Read more about healthcare data and crisis response:

Want to learn more about how Binary Fountain can improve your online reputation?

Schedule a Demo

 

About the Author

Kieran McQuilkin
Content Marketing Specialist

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February 27, 2020

Keys to a Winning Strategy for Local Listings Management [Infographic]

By: Kieran McQuilkin

How important are local listings for multi-location businesses?  When people conduct an online search, they are often looking for nearby options first and foremost. About 33% of consumers use search engines to find local businesses every day. And 50% of Google searches have local intent. Simply put, it means your enterprise needs a strong local…

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local-listings-infographic
Click to view full infographic.

How important are local listings for multi-location businesses? 

When people conduct an online search, they are often looking for nearby options first and foremost. About 33% of consumers use search engines to find local businesses every day. And 50% of Google searches have local intent.

Simply put, it means your enterprise needs a strong local listings strategy. Whether in-house, manually updating listings or through a vendor, every organization with multiple locations should focus on listings management as a main tenet of their marketing.

Consumers use local search in order to make purchase decisions, and your online listings are their front door.

Check out our local listings infographic for eye-opening statistics on the importance of managing them correctly.

Click here to view the full local listings infographic.

Want to learn more about how Binary Fountain can improve your online reputation?

Schedule a Demo

 

About the Author

Kieran McQuilkin
Content Marketing Specialist

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February 21, 2020

Prisma Health’s Transparency Journey [Webinar Recap]

By: Kieran McQuilkin

Who controls the online narrative for your brand? When patient experience managers at Prisma Health saw how third-party reviews led the conversation about their organization, they launched a plan to take back control of its digital reputation. To do so, they implemented a transparency program that leveraged first-party survey data to significantly boost web traffic…

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prisma-health-webinarWho controls the online narrative for your brand?

When patient experience managers at Prisma Health saw how third-party reviews led the conversation about their organization, they launched a plan to take back control of its digital reputation. To do so, they implemented a transparency program that leveraged first-party survey data to significantly boost web traffic and increase appointment requests by 56%.

In our latest on-demand webinar, Prisma Health Patient Experience Officer Theresa Varughese and Patient Experience Program Analyst David Clinkscales highlight their strategies for establishing an enterprise-wide transparency program, and lessons they learned along the way.

In the webinar, you will learn how to:

  • Identify the tenets of an effective communication plan during all phases of the transparency journey.
  • Select, train and empower physicians to serve in an influential role during all phases of the transparency journey.
  • Develop a comment review and appeals process that is consistent, simple and beneficial to the provider.

You can find a link to the on-demand webinar here and at the bottom of this page. Here are some of the key takeaways:

Communicate Early and Often

Both Varughese and Clinkscales agree that one of the most important aspects of establishing a transparency program is starting early. They scheduled meetings with the different divisions, practices, and administrators and started meeting biweekly with stakeholders.

There, they defined roles, responsibilities and timelines alongside partners at Binary Fountain, including who would participate companywide and how to handle pushback from physicians.

An important early step was asking chairs to appoint one or two transparency “champions” from their department. The right mix, according to Prisma Health’s experts, should include people who are older, younger, early adopters and later adopters; but they should all be positive and influential with their peers.

Empathize with Physicians

The buy-in priority for Prisma Health was the frontline physician, and how to handle the vulnerable topic of patient feedback at a time when they feel very exposed.

Varughese said to lead with empathy – many providers are hesitant to advertise negative reviews and to be reviewed similarly to a product on Amazon.

“You must listen, and seek to understand and be empathetic,” she said. “Research anything you don’t know about, teach them, empower them and help them look good with their peers.”

For the same reason, Prisma Health’s PX leaders recommend comprising your appeals committee of providers only. Peer-to-peer representation has given credibility to the committee that they say is invaluable.

Expect Gray Areas

Across the enterprise, Prisma Health receives about 750 new comments every week that need approval (or exclusion). But they aren’t all created equal.

Clinkscales said that black-and-white issues like PHI, profanity and billing won’t require much time to resolve in the appeals process, but there are more subjective gray areas that will require planning and attention.

He recommends wording your exclusion criteria in very clear language from the outset, limiting ambiguity as much as possible. By giving strict definitions of exclusions, you’ll limit the number of appeals and not have to debate with a provider whether a comment meets the criteria.

On the same token, Prisma Health’s experts suggest creating standards for the appeals timeline from the start, so providers acclimate quickly to the transparency system.

To learn more about their strategies and to see why leading organizations like Prisma Health use Binary Fountain’s transparency solution, check out the free webinar – now available on-demand.

Speakers:

  • Theresa Varughese, Patient Experience Officer, Prisma Health
  • David Clinkscales, Patient Experience Program Analyst, Prisma Health
  • Mike Warstler, Director of Sales – Healthcare, Binary Fountain

Ready to watch the webinar? Click here.

 

About the Author

Kieran McQuilkin
Content Marketing Specialist

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February 20, 2020

How to Remove Inaccurate Business Listings

By: Kieran McQuilkin

Online business listings have grown from a “nice-to-have” to a must-have if you want to attract new customers to your brick-and-mortar locations. According to Hubspot, 88% of smartphone users will either call or visit a business they research within 24 hours. Consumers rely on business listings to find services and expect to find accurate information there….

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listings-managementOnline business listings have grown from a “nice-to-have” to a must-have if you want to attract new customers to your brick-and-mortar locations. According to Hubspot, 88% of smartphone users will either call or visit a business they research within 24 hours. Consumers rely on business listings to find services and expect to find accurate information there.

In many ways, local listings (especially on Google) have become the homepage for your business online.

“Consumers are no longer using a business’s website as the source of truth for information that they need,” says Hannah Borchik, Binary Fountain’s Customer Success Manager. “Instead, they are going to that business’s local listing, finding what they need there and not going any further.”

Because of this heavy reliance on listings, having accurate business information is extremely important for customer acquisition. If a user finds inaccurate or misleading information about a business, they are unlikely to re-engage with that business in the future, which will damage your brand’s image.

In this article, we take a look at why accurate business listings matter, as well as how to remove inaccurate business listings. We’ll cover:

  • The benefits of accurate business listings
  • How to remove inaccurate listings
  • How to get buy-in for listings management
  • Why you should monitor reviews

Why Accurate Business Listings Matter 

Have you ever gone to a dry cleaner for that last-minute drop-off, thinking they were open (because their Google My Business profile said they would be), only to find out they were closed?

Because of inaccurate information, your dry cleaning needs went from an inconvenient errand to an emergency. After going back to Google Maps and finding a place that is open, you are able to get your dry cleaning taken care of.  

The next time you have an urgent dry cleaning need, who are you going to visit?  

If you are like most consumers, you are going back to the place that helped you in your time of need, even if it is a less convenient location. Why? Because you inherently trust them due to your previous interaction, and other customers do too.

So accurate business listings help you build trust with consumers before they even enter your doors. 

Accurate listings also help you get discovered on search engines like Google, where the accuracy of your name, address, phone number (NAP) and hours are extremely important for appearing in local searches. This can impact your visibility in search results and ultimately your ability to attract new customers. 

How to Remove Inaccurate Listings 

One of the potential issues you can run into is inaccurate business listings online. Typically, you will be able to edit these listings by claiming your profile on each listing site, like Google My Business or FourSquare. 

Beyond your NAP, make sure your photos, holidays, business description and other information are accurate as well. The more descriptive and informative a business profile you have, the more likely you are to appear in relevant searches by users.

To get you started, here are the top review sites you need to monitor for inaccurate listings. Many industry-specific sites generate their own listings from larger sites’ directories, so you will want to check those as well.

Once you have claimed your profile, it should be easy to go in and verify that the information is correct. If it is not, edit the profile pages to be accurate to your business information.

Additionally, you will want to remove any duplicate listings of your business to make sure you have one singular point of truth for search engines and directories to choose when displaying results.

“Believe it or not, sites like Google and Facebook will create listings, on their own, based on searches consumers make. So if Google and Facebook are unable to find local listings for your business, they will make sub-par and often incorrect listings for your business, thinking they are helping both you and the consumer when they’re really not,” Borchik says. 

The ultimate goal of any listings management strategy is to have the same information everywhere online. Removing or updating inaccurate listings gets you closer to consistency across your brand. 

“It’s important to remember that once you create online listings, you are not finished,” Borchik adds. “Once those listings are out there, people will be discovering them and also leaving reviews on them.” 

Google and Facebook in particular favor businesses with a high volume of high-quality reviews in addition to accurate business listing information.

How to Get Buy-In for a Listing Management Service 

If you need help justifying the expense for listings management to an executive, when you start claiming your listings online we recommend keeping track of referral traffic and engagements.

If you’ve done everything right, you should see a significant increase in referrals from search sites and new leads for your business. These are the kinds of results your executive team is looking for! 

Here are some of the metrics we recommend monitoring: 

  • Referral traffic from search engines 
  • Click-to-call rates from listings 
  • Leads coming from sources beyond your website 
  • Hours your staff spends on listings cleanup

Accurate listings are a “must-have,” not a “nice-to-have” feature of managing your online presence, but that doesn’t mean they’re unprofitable. For more on ROI metrics concerning your online reputation, read our recent blog post.

Accurate Online Listings Aren’t Enough to Get You to the Top 

Correcting all this information can be time-consuming across multiple listings, but listing management services like Binary Fountain make it easy for business owners and marketers to control their business’s online listings all in one place. This makes it easy to keep track of NAP, remove duplicate listings and improve your local SEO across multiple directories. 

At Binary Fountain, we have an all in one solution for businesses just like yours looking to clean up your business listings as well as monitor and respond to your online reviews. Our customer experience platform lets you edit hundreds of listings online, clean up duplicate profiles, monitor and respond to online reviews and monitor your social media platforms.   

If you need more information about improving your online presence, download one of our free e-books or watch our recent webinar on Listings Management.

Want to chat with one of our experts about your reputation management needs?

Schedule a Demo

 

About the Author

Kieran McQuilkin
Content Marketing Specialist

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February 14, 2020

Top Customer Engagement Metrics to Measure

By: Kieran McQuilkin

With the increased growth of data analytics over the last few years, it can be hard to focus on the right metrics for measuring what matters most to your business. If you’re like most healthcare marketers or practice managers, you know that consumer engagement is one of the many areas you need to focus on…

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customer-engagement-metricsWith the increased growth of data analytics over the last few years, it can be hard to focus on the right metrics for measuring what matters most to your business. If you’re like most healthcare marketers or practice managers, you know that consumer engagement is one of the many areas you need to focus on to truly measure your efforts in gaining and retaining patients. 

Engagement metrics are often considered “soft metrics,” meaning they don’t show a definitive ROI, but they do reveal how your business is perceived by customers and predict your ability to grow your customer base.

But what metrics should you monitor to know if your consumer engagement efforts are going well? What kind of numbers or trends should you be reporting to executives?

If you’re not sure, you’re in luck. We’re breaking down the top customer engagement metrics that healthcare professionals should analyze regularly.

In this article we will cover:

  • Measuring the quality and volume of online reviews 
  • Tracking engagement with internal surveys and ratings
  • The importance of net promoter scores (NPS)

Quality and Volume of Online Reviews

Thanks to technology, patients are taking a more active role in finding healthcare providers by conducting online research before choosing a provider. Kyruus reported in 2018 that 33% of patients found a medical provider on their own online, and that percentage is sure to have increased over the last two years.

The quality and volume of patient reviews is one of the easiest ways for you to measure your customer engagement online and it has the most direct ROI affiliated with it. According to a Patient Pop survey, nearly 70% of patients consider having a positive online reputation as a key factor in choosing a provider.

If that isn’t enough of a reason to pay attention to your online reputation, remember that online reviews are a key indicator of patient satisfaction. Paying attention to what patients say online not only impacts your ability to attract new patients, but also helps identify opportunities to increase your current patient satisfaction and ultimately retention. 

When looking at your online reviews, pay particular attention to:

  • Number of reviews 
  • Overall rating 
  • Ease of booking appointments 
  • How quickly they were able to see a doctor  
  • If the quality of care matched the patient’s expectations

Managing your online reputation can be hard if you don’t have the right tools in place to monitor your listings across multiple sites. Technology like Binary Fountain’s online reputation management platform allows you to view all of your online reviews (like Google, Healthgrades and Facebook) in one place.

Additionally, Binary Fountain’s platform offers Patient Feedback Scores (PFS) and Physician Social Indexes (PSI). 

The PFS score represents all aspects of the patient experience at your practice (telephones, parking, etc.) and feedback about the physician. Your PSI score only focuses on feedback about the physician, and therefore more closely matches reviews the doctor may see online.

Our platform also allows you to track specific interactions with patients, so you can zero in on areas to improve and follow up directly with the patient from a service recovery perspective.

These are the kinds of metrics your practice managers and executive team are going to care about as they directly influence the bottom line.

Internal Survey Results

Similar to online reviews, the volume of customers responding to patient experience surveys is a good indicator of how your practice is perceived. If you are sending out a lot of surveys without much response, you may not be getting the kind of feedback you need to improve the patient experience.

Having low response rates could mean a variety of things, from patients being satisfied with your level of service to them having one foot out the door and exploring a different provider.

When looking at your survey results, pay close attention to these areas – they will probably have the most direct impact on your bottom line: 

  • Bedside manner of physicians and staff 
  • Patients feeling like they are listened to 
  • Wait times 
  • Physicians answering patient questions or concerns 
  • Patients receiving an accurate and timely diagnosis 

Getting this customer feedback will help your executives make the right operational decisions needed to improve patient retention, which should be the ultimate goal of your survey data. 

To inform you approach to attracting survey responses, we have this guide on how to write surveys that will be helpful for your patients and for your organization.

NPS Score

In addition to your online reputation management and internal surveys, no customer engagement metrics are complete without the net promoter score. This metric determines how likely your current patients are to recommend your practice to others.

This metric should give you a clear idea of how likely your current customers are to refer your practice to friends, family or other acquaintances. While online reviews are trusted just as much as personal referrals, personal recommendations are still the highest-quality lead possible for your business.

Don’t ignore your net promoter score if you want to focus on growing your patient base!

You Can Own Your Reputation Management

If you focus on these customer engagement metrics, you are sure to grow patient acquisition and retention for your practice. No healthcare marketing strategy is complete without an active plan for maintaining a good reputation online.

At Binary Fountain, we have the reputation management solutions your practice needs to manage all of your online reviews in one place, including post-visit surveys and social media platforms. We help businesses like yours organize customer feedback and get the actionable insights you need to make operational changes and improve the customer experience.

Download one of our free e-books or watch one of our free, on-demand webinars to learn more about how our reputation management platform can help you take control of your online presence.

Want a personalized tour of the Binary Fountain platform?

Schedule a Demo

 

About the Author

Kieran McQuilkin
Content Marketing Specialist

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February 12, 2020

10 Online Reputation Management Books for Savvy Digital Marketers

By: Kieran McQuilkin

What you’ll learn in this post: Which reputation management books are worth reading in 2020 How to uncover the best content and expert advice for ORM strategies Ways to build marketing skills and improve your company’s online presence About 1,000 books on Amazon have ‘online reputation’ in their title, so marketers have plenty of options…

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reputation-management-booksWhat you’ll learn in this post:

  • Which reputation management books are worth reading in 2020
  • How to uncover the best content and expert advice for ORM strategies
  • Ways to build marketing skills and improve your company’s online presence

About 1,000 books on Amazon have ‘online reputation’ in their title, so marketers have plenty of options when it comes to researching the topic. But which ones are worth your time? 

The short answer is that it depends what your goals are. Some reputation management books are written from a marketing perspective, exploring how companies can increase awareness, build interest, attract loyalty and generate business leads. Others dive into the trenches of online reputation protection and defense, analyzing public relations, legal issues, search engine marketing and customer service. 

Whatever you’re looking for in a reputation management book, there’s no magic formula or quick fix. Digital marketing pros need to take in as much quality information as possible and test strategies with real customers to find out what works best for their business. 

You can find some of that information in Binary Fountain’s e-books and case studies, which all focus on ORM and its many facets. For a deeper dive into the world of online reputations, we’ve curated a list of 10 books and e-books that will help get your ORM strategy at the front of the pack.

Hug Your Haters: How to Embrace Complaints and Keep Your Customers, Jay Baer 

Based on an exten­sive proprietary study of how, where, and why we complain, Hug Your Haters makes the case that companies must take all customer complaints seriously, invest in customer service as a priority and develop appropriate processes for handling complaints internally. Baer explains how to deal with “haters” using specific play­books and formulas from Fortune 500 companies. You’ll gain insight on how to embrace complaints, put negative comments to work for you and turn bad news into good outcomes.

Establishing, Managing and Protecting Your Online Reputation: A Social Media Guide for Physicians and Medical Practices, Kevin Pho 

Maybe you’re not a big social media user, but your patients are. And they rely on social media sources when they’re finding a doctor or a medical practice. This comprehensive guide to physicians and social media includes insights from practicing physician and author Dr. Kevin Pho. Pho offers healthcare providers advice on branding themselves on major social media networks, insider tips on responding to online ratings and a guide to the most prominent healthcare review sites. 

Spin Sucks: Communication and Reputation Management in the Digital Age, Gini Dietrich 

Most PR books tell you how to “spin” your message, but “Spin Sucks” aims to teach you how to communicate honestly, responsibly, openly and authentically. PR thought leader and blogger Gini Dietrich created this actionable guide for business leaders who understand there are new rules to communications, but don’t know how to capitalize on them. You’ll learn how to share your story more powerfully, humanize your organization, create fresh content and handle online criticism, among many other lessons.

Fanocracy: Turning Fans into Customers and Customers into Fans, David Meerman Scott 

In this book, business growth strategist David Meerman Scott and fandom expert Reiko Scott explore the neuroscience of fandom and interview young entrepreneurs, veteran business owners, nonprofits and other companies to pinpoint which practices separate organizations that flourish from those that plateau. Their road map will help you convert customers’ ardor into buying power, using examples from organizations including MeUndies, HeadCount, Hagerty and HubSpot. 

How to Protect (or Destroy) Your Reputation Online, John P. David 

This ORM strategy book peeks into the dark alleyways of the internet and explains how to respond to negative search engine results, product reviews and other unfortunate situations. You’ll read about removing content from search results, responding to online attacks, managing online reviews and using marketing strategies to bolster your bottom line. David also covers how to deal with hate blogs, Google’s “right to be forgotten,” the business of online complaint sites and much more. 

Managing Online Reputation: How to Protect Your Company on Social Media, Charlie Pownall 

This book draws on interviews with environmental activists, media and IP lawyers, IT security, digital forensics, emergency response and search engine marketing professionals to determine how companies should plan for hostile online incidents. The practical guide to protecting and defending your organization’s name, image and reputation examines the threats posed by the internet and social media and offers strategies to respond to digital hostility, breaches and leaks.

The 18 Immutable Laws of Corporate Reputation: Creating, Protecting, and Repairing Your Most Valuable Asset, Ronald J. Alsop 

Following years as a reporter at the Wall Street Journal, where he witnessed the implosion of Enron and watched as a scandal rocked the Catholic Church, Alsop knows a thing or two about crisis management. In this book, he offers 18 rules for building a solid corporate reputation and protecting it through fair weather and stormy seas. These pages offer a holistic view of reputation that can help answer the “why” of your ORM strategy. 

Critical Moments: The New Mindset of Reputation Management, Bill Coletti 

In Critical Moments, corporate communications expert Bill Coletti strategizes reputational excellence by meeting the needs and expectations of the public. He guides you through the Four A’s – Awareness, Assessment, Authority and Action – that will help develop your company’s situational understanding, research agenda, operational risks and action plan to recover and grow your reputation. 

Online Reputation Management Guide: 280 Expert Tips for Improving Your Personal Reputation Management, Adam Gold 

This book offers a wealth of ideas to help you substantially improve your reputation, including ORM best practices, little-known tips and learnable skills. Gold aims to dispel reputation management myths and offer industry-tested solutions to marketing challenges, ranging from personal growth to effective management methods.

Fame and Fortune: How Successful Companies Build Winning Reputations, Charles J. Fombrun and Cess van Riel 

The main features of this introductory book are data-heavy visuals that show, rather than tell, how to enhance your corporate reputation as a whole. Fombrun and van Riel present a roadmap that provides real-world case studies from well-known companies like FedEx, showing how to measure a company’s reputation, estimate its business value and systematically enhance it over the short term and long run.

Want to learn more about how Binary Fountain can improve your online reputation?

Schedule a Demo

 

About the Author

Kieran McQuilkin
Content Marketing Specialist

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