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May 01, 2020

Reputation Management KPIs: Tracking Key Metrics of Your Online Presence

By: Kieran McQuilkin

In today’s digital world, what consumers think, say and share about your company matters, regardless of what industry you are in. Warren Buffet famously said, “It takes 20 years to build a reputation and five minutes to ruin it. If you think about that, you’ll do things differently.” If you’ve put work into managing your…

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reputation-management-kpiIn today’s digital world, what consumers think, say and share about your company matters, regardless of what industry you are in.

Warren Buffet famously said, “It takes 20 years to build a reputation and five minutes to ruin it. If you think about that, you’ll do things differently.”

If you’ve put work into managing your online reputation, chances are you know just how true that quote is. Building a stellar business listing online takes time, dedication and a strategy to put your best foot forward for customer acquisition.

But how do you know if all your work is having the desired impact? What KPIs should you be measuring for your reputation management program?

Understanding the right way to choose and measure KPIs is critical to determining your campaign’s return on investment (ROI). Measuring the right things and not just vanity metrics will help you build the brand you want to online, helping you attract new customers and retaining the ones you currently have.

We are going to look at some of the most important reputation management KPIs and how to measure the success of your program.

Volume and Quality of Online Reviews

Monitoring the effectiveness of your reputation management campaign starts with making sure you see an increase in the number of customer reviews and a higher average rating than before.

Reviews are social proof that potential customers use to determine if your business will meet their needs. Most customers are looking for a high volume of reviews because it makes your business look credible, experienced and like a vital part of the local community.

If you are seeing an improvement in the number and quality of your online reviews, you are on the right track.

Here are some other key metrics to measure your online presence:

  • Overall customer sentiment
  • Referrals or leads from review sites
  • Website traffic from organic search and social media platforms

Remember, while online reviews can greatly help attract new customers, they’re also a positive indicator that you will retain the business of current customers. Take special care to respond to both positive and negative reviews to encourage customer interaction and learn how to improve the customer experience.

Turning Fans into Advocates

Beyond just looking at reviews online, one of the goals of any reputation management program should be building a lifelong relationship with your customer. Growing a business isn’t just about acquiring new customers: It’s about taking the customers you have now and making them advocates for your brand.

metrics-reputation-managementIf you are focusing on the customer experience and meeting their expectations, chances are you already have strong support from your community. If you are struggling to satisfy your current customer base, you need to be measuring loyalty and advocacy.

To do this, make sure you are measuring the current impact of your brand advocates and identifying highly satisfied customers who are perfect candidates for sharing information about your business on social media platforms.

Your KPIs for turning your customers into advocates include:

  • Volume of customer testimonials shared on social media
  • Customer engagement metrics on your website and social media channels
  • Number of brand advocates (social listening metrics)
  • Positive comments on public, third-party directories

Don’t Forget to Monitor Offline KPIs

While measuring your impact online may be straightforward, there are plenty of offline KPIs to track in order to measure the true ROI of your reputation management program. Reducing customer churn or increasing patient retention, for example, are far more important to your business than how many reviews you have on your social media profiles.

As a customer experience manager or marketer, you always want to make sure your efforts have the downstream impact that you intended and that you aren’t just measuring vanity metrics.

When evaluating the impact of a reputation management campaign, be sure to look at these metrics to determine if you are getting the results you expect:

  • Customer lifetime value (CLV)
  • Customer satisfaction surveys (both quality and number of responses)
  • Word-of-mouth customer referrals
  • Estimated market share
  • Net promoter score

Seeing improvements in these offline KPIs will lead to the business growth you need from a reputation management program.

Get the Most Out of Your Reputation Management Campaign

Nothing is more important than delivering as much bottom-line value as possible to your customers and to your business.

Using these KPIs will help you identify areas where you can improve the customer experience and simultaneously attract new business leads. By focusing on the right KPIs for your reputation management campaign, you will ensure that your investment is worth the time and money for both your business and your customers.

Binary Fountain’s reputation management software is designed to give your business actionable insights that will improve your business operations and better meet your customers’ expectations. Thanks to our proprietary natural language processing (NLP) technology and data analysis, we create customized online reputation management solutions for businesses just like yours.

If you want to learn more about how to measure the value of reputation management, check out this free webinar or you can schedule a demo of our review management software.

About the Author

Kieran McQuilkin
Content Marketing Specialist

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April 29, 2020

How Healthcare Brands Can Prepare for COVID-19 Recovery

By: Kieran McQuilkin

Marketers and patient experience managers are hard at work adjusting to the new realities of healthcare, as they respond to seismic shifts in consumer behavior and changes in services while preparing for the long-term recovery from COVID-19. Appointments across the medical spectrum are being postponed and cancelled, services have been suspended with unclear restart dates, and innovations like telemedicine are moving to the forefront. With life as a…

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healthcare-covid-19-recoveryMarketers and patient experience managers are hard at work adjusting to the new realities of healthcare, as they respond to seismic shifts in consumer behavior and changes in services while preparing for the long-term recovery from COVID-19.

Appointments across the medical spectrum are being postponed and cancelled, services have been suspended with unclear restart dates, and innovations like telemedicine are moving to the forefront.

With life as a healthcare professional changing by the day – and likely permanently – prioritizing updates to your brand’s online presence is essential as we look toward the months and years ahead.

Here are ways to prepare your healthcare organization’s digital footprint for the lasting transformation brought on by the coronavirus outbreak.

Realize the Importance of Listings

The current drop in search traffic and website visits has highlighted the growing importance of displaying business information clearly on search engine results pages (SERP).

Many healthcare brands have updated business descriptions, hours and services on third-party directories like Google, Yelp, Healthgrades, ZocDoc, WebMD and CareDash. Those changes needed to be timely and accurate across all enterprise locations, and so do future updates as you begin offering those services once again.

While some features, like Google My Business’s COVID-19 Posts, will automatically expire, other listings and attributes may need to be altered as things start returning to normal. If you haven’t already, consider building a spreadsheet with accounts you’ve updated so COVID-19 information can be easily found and removed later.

If you have added to your websites’ meta information, such as COVID-19 announcements through schema, make sure your web manager is prepared to update that information for key pages like your homepage, provider profiles and location pages as services start running normally.

Practices around the country are launching or increasing telemedicine services more than ever. If you fall into that category, it’s imperative to include virtual health services throughout your website and third-party listings. These changes will not only keep patients informed about care options, but also will build your authority as a telemedicine provider for the long term.

healthcare-covid-19-recovery-example
This healthcare system has telemedicine links, screening options and a chatbot on its website.

These are some of the questions you should answer across your facility listings:

  • Are you seeing new patients or just existing patients via telemedicine?
  • What specific health issues can you help with via telemedicine?
  • What hours are virtual services available?
  • How do I know if my care provider is offering virtual visits?
  • Will insurance cover a telemedicine visit with a provider?

Listen to the Social Media Conversation

Internet users are searching less for healthcare providers – Binary Fountain clients saw total searches decrease by 78% between Feb. 24 and April 20. But they’re also taking in significantly more content than usual. By monitoring the COVID-19 conversation across platforms and using social listening technology, you can understand consumer sentiment much more completely than in the past.

Though search traffic will eventually increase and social media traffic will eventually decrease as COVID-19 recovery begins for healthcare brands, the current influx of online engagement likely will help long-tail organic search results. Marketers that find ways to maximize social media content that is currently attracting engagements can improve the foundation of their online reputation for the long term.

Most importantly for the social media conversation, consumers trust local healthcare experts more than any other source for coronavirus-related information. Healthcare organizations can use that magnified trust to cement their position as trusted information sources for their communities in the future.

Where appropriate, you can continue highlighting your staff and frontline providers, who have become effective healthcare brand ambassadors during the crisis. People won’t forget the heroes that combatted the pandemic, and social media is a perfect tool to amplify the positive sentiment around your staff and your brand.

With fewer advertising dollars in most healthcare marketing budgets, now might also be a good time for you to experiment with new content types, like webinars, chatbots and short videos. On Facebook and Instagram, also consider using “Stories” to educate younger demographics about services like telemedicine.

Generate Reviews and Analyze New Feedback

With online brand mentions related to the coronavirus appearing so frequently – nearly 100,000 in April for Binary Fountain clients alone – healthcare organizations will have to prioritize backlogged review responses and social media engagement by the amount of informational value they can provide to patients and their communities.

But don’t neglect other healthcare conversations that may arise from the COVID-19 recovery process.

Healthcare brands should prepare to respond to reviews and surveys for people who have chronic conditions or have put off elective treatments until May or later. How you respond to the pent-up concerns of that population once those sorts of appointments are back up and running will have a major impact on your brand reputation.

Furthermore, your review generation and survey strategies will need adjustments as consumers adjust to new expectations of care as the pandemic loosens its grip. Especially for telemedicine offerings, reviews in the coming months will offer insight into how to make patients feel comfortable with less traditional paths to care.

Here are some other considerations for healthcare organizations as review generation efforts ramp back up:

  • Highlighting how communities can help your care locations recover by writing positive reviews online.
  • Monitoring employer reviews as healthcare workers feel the drawn-out effects of pay cuts, furloughs and burnout.
  • Preparing to field questions and comments about new telemedicine services.

There’s no easy path ahead for healthcare marketers as the nation begins to recover and return to some sense of normalcy. But if you can match your listings, messaging and reviews with your operational reality, patients will be several steps closer to seeing you as a trustworthy partner in care.

For more on preparing your brand to manage COVID-19 now and beyond, visit our Resources Page and browse these posts:

About the Author

Kieran McQuilkin
Content Marketing Specialist

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April 28, 2020

Patient Experience Week 2020: A Guide to Must-See Virtual Presentations

By: Erik Fessler

Patient Experience Week 2020 is upon us! This week is an annual celebration promoted by The Beryl Institute. The goal is to celebrate and learn from organizations and individuals who are working to improve patient care by promoting better patient experiences. This week usually also includes a yearly gathering for in-person presentations and events. Unfortunately,…

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patient-experience-week-2020Patient Experience Week 2020 is upon us! This week is an annual celebration promoted by The Beryl Institute. The goal is to celebrate and learn from organizations and individuals who are working to improve patient care by promoting better patient experiences.

This week usually also includes a yearly gathering for in-person presentations and events. Unfortunately, due to COVID-19, the live event has been moved online, resulting in a virtual event that will have events taking place from April to September.

Below, we have listed the top five virtual presentations we believe you won’t want to miss.

Compassion: A Powerful Connector of Patient and Caregiver Experience
Wednesday, June 17, 2020
12:00 – 1:00 PM

Patient experience and provider well-being are both critical to running effective caregiving organizations. This session will guide you through the process Compassionate Care used to create a curriculum that synergizes both.

The Beryl Institute – Ipsos Px Pulse: Consumer Perspectives on Patient Experience in the U.S.
Wednesday, July 29, 2020
12:00 – 1:00 PM

This event will present the Beryl Institute’s PX Pulse survey, a novel survey that seeks to help us all better understand the current perspectives of patient experience throughout the US healthcare system. The session will explain how the survey works and summarize the finding of the first two quarters of this year.

Including Parent Concerns in a Pediatric Hospital Community Health Needs Assessment
Monday, June 29, 2020
12:00 – 1:00 PM

If you’re looking for new ways to engage and build relationships with your community, look no further than this presentation. Learn how the St. Louis Children’s Hospital provides health-related resources and education to local families by surveying and then implementing community benefit programs.

Transforming Your Culture to Improve the Patient Experience in the Age of Consumerism
Wednesday, August 26, 2020
5:00 – 6:00 PM

Could you imagine being tasked with responding to every single online review your organization received, both positive and negative? In this Patient Experience Week 2020 presentation, we’ll learn what Yuma Regional Medical Center learned by doing so.

Human Connection and Hope in Healthcare: Using Social Media for Good
Friday, August 28, 2020
12:00 – 1:00 PM

This event is another valuable learning opportunity for those seeking to use social media as a tool to increase patient experience. Learn why social media is important, how to use it effectively, and way socials media should not be used in healthcare.

What to Learn More About Patient Experience?

View some of our blog posts, case studies, and webinars:

About the Author

Erik Fessler
Marketing Coordinator

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April 27, 2020

How to Optimize LinkedIn Profiles for Healthcare Brands

By: Kieran McQuilkin

If you manage the brand for a medical practice or a hospital, you’ve probably put a lot of effort into your social media presence and your search engine optimization over the years. Chances are, however, you have not spent as much time working on your LinkedIn presence. That’s a shame, because LinkedIn is far more…

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linkedin-healthcareIf you manage the brand for a medical practice or a hospital, you’ve probably put a lot of effort into your social media presence and your search engine optimization over the years.

Chances are, however, you have not spent as much time working on your LinkedIn presence. That’s a shame, because LinkedIn is far more than just an online job board or professional networking site.

Like Facebook or Instagram, LinkedIn is a full social media network – and a popular one – where businesses can share content and connect with local communities. Healthcare systems and hospitals can boost their public profile via LinkedIn like any other social media platform.

If you are looking for a leg up on the competition, optimizing your LinkedIn profile will not only connect your company with industry professionals, but also will position your brand up as a thought leader and generate new leads for your business.

Here are the five best ways for to optimize your LinkedIn profile and strengthen your online presence.

In this article, we will cover:

  • Optimizing your keywords
  • Creating a custom URL
  • Joining groups on LinkedIn
  • Using ad space on LinkedIn
  • Posting regular, relevant content

Optimize for Your Healthcare Brand’s Keywords

You can use SEO on your LinkedIn profile just like you can a webpage or other social media platforms. You will want to make sure that the keywords reflect what your service providers offer, to ensure that industry professionals and consumers alike can find you on the platform.

In order to make the most out of this tactic, make sure you identify the right keywords and phrases that people search most frequently to ensure you are getting more eyes on your profile and your content.

Create a Custom LinkedIn URL

Did you know you can create a custom LinkedIn URL for your business?

You can build a unique URL for your LinkedIn profile when you create your business profile or by editing your existing profile. Just click on the pencil icon to change your URL in your public profile settings.

Using a custom URL makes your business profile more professional than a randomly generated URL and could strengthen your SEO. If your organization has multiple LinkedIn pages, be sure to create unique URLs for each hospital, location or provider profile.

Join Healthcare Groups on LinkedIn’s Network

LinkedIn is best used as a professional networking platform, but it can also be used to expand your business’s network. We recommend joining the most popular groups for doctors and other healthcare providers on LinkedIn to establish your practice as a part of the community. These groups include  Medical Doctor (MD) NetworkInnovations in Health and Networking for Business Professionals & Doctors.

Don’t just join a group and forget about it. Be an active participant in conversations with other members about their content or questions they have asked in the group. The most important part about building a community is providing value to the group and sharing knowledge to strengthen your credibility as healthcare experts on LinkedIn.

Use Ad Space to Your Advantage

Like other social media platforms, LinkedIn offers businesses the ability to deliver ads to specific audiences on the platform. Businesses can set up ads and track a variety of KPIs, including traffic and leads, while optimizing campaign performance around specific keywords and geo-locations.

Make sure to leverage LinkedIn’s customer persona features to refine your social outreach. For example, if you operate a pediatrics practice, your target audience will be much more defined than if you run a general practice.

Post Regularly on LinkedIn

Much like other social media platforms, posting regularly on LinkedIn helps you build an audience, appear in newsfeeds and establish your medical experts as trustworthy information sources.

You should aim to engage with your audience by posting regular updates for events you are part of, relevant industry articles and company announcements. Adding interesting multimedia assets like images and videos is highly encouraged whenever possible.

Pro tip: company pages can include three large (646px by 220px) images at the top of the listing page. Each of these images can include a link back to your company website.

We also recommend regularly posting job openings as a way to attract qualified candidates for your practice.

Focusing on Your Online Reputation

Once you’ve optimized your LinkedIn profile, you’re ready to refocus marketing efforts on improving your online presence elsewhere. If you are a practice manager or a healthcare marketer, we recommend focusing on your online reputation management.

At Binary Fountain, we provide reputation management solutions built specifically for medical practices, including a platform that allows you to track customer engagement across multiple business listings, social media accounts and review sites.

Schedule a demo today to learn more about our comprehensive reputation management platform or our user-friendly social media management tools.

Schedule a Demo

 

About the Author

Kieran McQuilkin
Content Marketing Specialist

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April 23, 2020

Telemedicine Marketing: How to Manage Listings for Virtual Care

By: Erik Fessler

Whether your organization sees virtual care as a COVID-19 stopgap measure or a new permanent service, it’s important to ensure your telemedicine marketing is working effectively. Your online listings are the primary way potential patients will find you and your services in search engines. It’s important to ensure they are optimized for telemedicine. Below are…

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telemedicine-marketingWhether your organization sees virtual care as a COVID-19 stopgap measure or a new permanent service, it’s important to ensure your telemedicine marketing is working effectively.

Your online listings are the primary way potential patients will find you and your services in search engines. It’s important to ensure they are optimized for telemedicine. Below are six suggestions to increase your odds of attracting these patients.

1. Ensure All Top Telemedicine Listings Are Claimed

Start your telemedicine listings management strategy by taking stock of your organization’s existing listings and removing inaccurate business listings. Having accurate business listings will help patients find you and your services.

Make sure your practice’s Google My Business, Yelp, and Facebook Business Pages are claimed to get the most out of your telemedicine marketing. These listing sites all have unique tools to promote your telemedicine offerings.

We also suggest that all of your providers have listings on Healthgrades, WebMD, CareDash, Vitals, and RateMDs. These sites allow providers to set themselves apart as telemedicine providers.

2. Add Telemedicine to Your Provider Profiles

To optimize Google Search results, you can take advantage of preview text that displays below your webpage and domain name. Many search engines use the first few lines of a provider’s bio to generate this preview for profile page results. Many internal website search tools do this as well.

If telemedicine is your primary means of seeing patients during COVID-19, it would pay to use the word early in your bios. This helps increase the chances of telemedicine appearing in your providers’ search previews.

telemedicine-marketing

Source: Healthgrades

While you’re reading over your bios, you can ensure you’re using other best practices. These include: speaking in a conversational tone, writing in the 2nd person (using “you” and “your” to speak to your patients instead of “he/she” and “we” to speak about the provider or organization), and avoiding medical jargon and technical terms.

3. Use Telemedicine Keywords to Rank in Search Engines

Keywords are words and phrases within the copy of your listing that make it possible for people to find you using search engines. To signal your service availability, “telemedicine” and “virtual care” can be among your primary keywords, and commonly searched names for your specialties should serve as additional keywords.

While advanced keyword tools exist for purchase, there are free resources you can also use to discover keywords quickly. WordStream offers a free keyword tool that displays search volumes, CPC (cost per click, for paid search engine promotion), and competition ratings for keywords. It will also give you alternative keyword suggestions to consider. Wordtracker Scout is a free Chrome extension you can use to see which keywords other websites are using. Google offers AdWords account holders a Keyword planner that is useful for optimizing your keywords specifically for Google ads. Those without accounts can also use Google Trends to see basic reports on keyword popularity.

Be careful not to go overboard with keywords. A good keyword strategy seeks to attract the most relevant patients, but not the most viewers overall. Casting too wide a net will hurt your search rankings long term. Initial visitors won’t find your listing relevant and will quickly leave to find more relevant content. These quick visits will raise your bounce rate and hurt your quality score in search engines. This may trigger search engines such as Google to give you a lower ranking.

4. Use the Unique Tools Each Listing Offers to Your Advantage

Each third-party listing website presents slightly different opportunities for your telemedicine marketing efforts. Here are a few site-specific features you’ll want to use to your advantage:

  • Google My Business: A recent new feature allows you to enter a virtual care offering into your organization’s profile. This will trigger a “get online care” link to appear within your listing on Search and Maps. Clicking the link will guide clients to your virtual care webpage.
  • Yelp: The COVID-19 Update banners that appear on listings are customizable and present an opportunity to promote telemedicine appointments. Bay Area Adult ADHD makes great use of this tool. The banner is made even more effective by the telemedicine scheduling tool.
  • Healthgrades: The site developed a Coronavirus chatbot in order to educate the public on COVID-19. It’s also designed to help keep infected patients out of waiting rooms. The chatbot helps users identify if they may have symptoms of the virus. It then connects them with local physicians offering online appointments. Make sure your providers show up among the list of providers offering telemedicine.
  • CareDash: Providers can enable the “online care available” attribute on their CareDash provider profile pages. You can also specify which states you are able to provide virtual care in. See below for an example.

caredash-virtual-care-provider

Source: CareDash

Additionally, most provider listing websites now display badges on the search previews of physicians that offer telemedicine. Most allow users to filter out providers that don’t offer the service. Make sure your providers are standing out by activating these settings.

5. Write Compelling Calls to Action

Your customers aren’t likely to take action if you haven’t asked them to do so. CTAs are any messages that tell a reader what action you want them to take. “Sign Up Now” and “Click Here” are CTAs you’ve probably seen many times before. CTAs aren’t meant to convince your readers to book an appointment on their own – that’s the listing copy’s job. Instead, they’re meant to spur interested readers to take the next step towards becoming patients. In terms of your telemedicine marketing, this will most likely mean clicking a link to your website or making an appointment with a scheduling tool.

CTAs are a small and simple thing, but well-written CTAs can have big impacts on your listings. Your calls to action don’t necessarily have to be two words long and in capital letters. They do need to be clear, direct, and concise. “Call to schedule an appointment” or “Book telemedicine sessions here” are examples of CTAs that guide your clients in the right direction.

6. Encourage Reviews and Recommendations

Once you’ve claimed and optimized your online listings, it’s time to start collecting telemedicine-specific patient reviews and recommendations. Listings with a high volume of reviews tend to rank higher in search engines. They see improved click-through rates on CTAs and assist patients in their decision-making process. But be mindful of listings websites, such as Google My Business and Yelp, that have strict policies against review solicitation. It’s important to familiarize yourself with the rules of each platform.

In order to generate new reviews, we suggest following up with patients via email or text message. The online nature of telemedicine gives you increased access to contact information you can leverage. Use it to drive testimonials for increased online reach. Your satisfied patients can help new clients find you.

Once you start receiving reviews, it’s essential that you follow best practices for responding to patient reviews. Recently, Google turned off review responses due to the influx of reviews regarding COVID-19. Now that review responses have returned to Google My Business, you can respond to patients and thank them for taking the time to provide feedback.

About the Author

Erik Fessler
Marketing Coordinator

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April 20, 2020

Listings Management Checklist for Property Managers During COVID-19 

By: Kieran McQuilkin

Property managers have found themselves at the front lines of the COVID-19 crisis, where care for their residents, employees and properties are paramount. Though acquiring new tenants isn’t the central focus for most of the multifamily industry at present, there’s an opportunity for your marketing and outreach efforts to come out stronger on the other side. Weekly online traffic to property managers’ rental listings was…

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covid-19-listings-property-managersProperty managers have found themselves at the front lines of the COVID-19 crisis, where care for their residents, employees and properties are paramount. Though acquiring new tenants isn’t the central focus for most of the multifamily industry at present, there’s an opportunity for your marketing and outreach efforts to come out stronger on the other side.

Weekly online traffic to property managers’ rental listings was down 15% in late March, according to RealPage. That number is expected to continue dropping, even as historical rental demand peaks between April and June.

What remains is the responsibility of property management companies to serve renters who still need to move during this unpredictable leasing season. With fewer searchers and more competition for clicks, optimizing your online listings can build the trust of hesitant consumers and differentiate your properties from the rest.

Anticipate COVID-19 Questions on Listings

The most common coronavirus-related communications will concern prevention practices, changes in office hours and policies, and virtual tour availability.

On search engine listings, social media profiles, rental directories and their own webpages, property managers need to anticipate and respond to frequent questions on a global and local level. They also should publicly communicate what precautions are being taken and reminding staff of best practices.

Here are some questions to answer on public listings:

  • Is the leasing office still open, and how do I get in touch?
  • Have your policies on rent freezes and rent raises changed?
  • Do your properties allow movers on site?
  • Can I still move in to an apartment?
  • Where can I find images of buildings and rental units?

This information, along with other relevant contact information, should be clear on all platforms that tenants usually browse while searching for your properties. Preventative measures – even seemingly obvious ones – should also populate your website, listings and social feeds. This signals to prospective residents how seriously you take the situation and what you’re doing to protect tenants.

Your listings management strategy should also anticipate questions in the event that COVID-19 affects your properties, for example, if a community outbreak forces you to temporarily stop accepting applications.

Update Search Results for Potential Residents

 The leasing process has been tremendously impacted by COVID-19. Three-quarters of property managers are changing the way they handle showings, 13% have halted them altogether, and 27% have moved to only virtual or self-showings, according to a recent AppFolio survey.

 If you are still looking for tenants, it should be apparent on each property’s listings. To display that information for search, review guidance from Google My Business on how to change your business hours, indicate temporary closures or create COVID-19 posts.

Make it clear to prospects if tours are available by appointment only, and strongly consider using digital tools to hold virtual appointments or tours. If you don’t usually promote virtual tours as heavily, now is the time to highlight that service. Here are some services that you should consider listing on all third-party directories:

  • Video tours or self-service tours
  • Remote showings
  • Photo galleries
  • Online applications
  • Online payments
  • Screening tools

Be sure to stay up to date on changes in relevant directories, like Google My Business, Zillow and Facebook. You can add a link to the “Appointments” attribute on GMB to guide searchers toward scheduling virtual appointments, if they are available.

You can also now add coronavirus-related special announcements to rich results on Google Search. This article explains how to submit and display those announcements. New questions and answers on Google Q&A have been suspended, but new Google reviews and review responses are being published.

Communicate with Current Tenants

Your online services are a keystone of keeping up with tenant communications and rent payments as the coronavirus outbreak continues.

When possible, drive residents to web-based services, apps and portals by promoting their availability on your website and in social media content. Avoid handling checks by encouraging electronic payments – and make account setup instructions widely available.

Here are some resident questions that you should answer across your online listings:

  • Is my building following social distancing guidelines and other prevention methods?
  • If I am suddenly unable to pay my rent, what can I do?
  • Are virtual services available, such as maintenance requests and rent payment?
  • Are there adjustments to resident policies or amenity availability?
  • Can I still move out? Are movers allowed on the property?

If you have the bandwidth as a marketer or communications specialist, you can also consider publishing COVID-19-related tenant communications for those looking for homeschooling, food options or rent assistance. When appropriate, list these offerings where prospective residents can see them, as they search for a trustworthy, community-oriented property manager.

For more on reputation management during the coronavirus health crisis, you can visit our COVID-19 Resources Page and browse these articles:

About the Author

Kieran McQuilkin
Content Marketing Specialist

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April 17, 2020

The Online Conversation Around COVID-19 [Infographic]

By: Kieran McQuilkin

How do you engage with the online conversation surrounding COVID-19? First, you have to know what patients and consumers are saying – and where they’re saying it. Binary Fountain’s platform has collected more than 150,000 online mentions regarding the coronavirus pandemic. Those mentions, across surveys, social media and third-party listings, have increased by more than 8,000%…

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covid-19-infographic
Click to view full infographic.

How do you engage with the online conversation surrounding COVID-19? First, you have to know what patients and consumers are saying – and where they’re saying it.

Binary Fountain’s platform has collected more than 150,000 online mentions regarding the coronavirus pandemic. Those mentions, across surveys, social media and third-party listings, have increased by more than 8,000% between January and March, with the pace still rising.

In our latest infographic, we’re sharing what we learned about the COVID-19 conversation using data from our healthcare clients. Here are some of the key highlights:

Social media is more densely populated with COVID-19-related brand mentions than third-party review sites, as 75% of consumers use social media every day for virus information. Twitter is attracting the most mentions – more than 100,000 – but Facebook and Instagram are rising in popularity.

Though organic search engine traffic for Binary Fountain clients decreased by 65% between early March and early April, phone calls to healthcare systems from Google Search rose in March as patients asked about coronavirus symptoms, testing and cancellations for other medical appointments.

However, the number of clicks to phone calls on Google My Business profiles has now fallen by 45% in that timeframe. That decrease is smaller, though, than the decrease of clicks to websites (-56%) and clicks to directions (-74%).

With brand mentions related to coronavirus appearing so frequently – more than 53,000 in the first half of April – healthcare organizations will have to prioritize review responses and social media engagement by the amount of informational value they can provide to patients and their communities.

So, how can health systems track the online conversation and keep consumers informed?

Click here to view the full infographic.

For more on reputation management during the coronavirus health crisis, you can visit our COVID-19 Resources Page and browse these articles:

About the Author

Kieran McQuilkin
Content Marketing Specialist

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April 14, 2020

[Webinar Recap] COVID-19: Healthcare Marketing During a Crisis and the New Normal

By: Kieran McQuilkin

Most industries will be forever changed by the COVID-19 pandemic, with healthcare near the top of the list. Is your marketing team adjusting your strategy and preparing your brand for life after the coronavirus? We brought together Reed Smith, Vice President of Digital Services at healthcare marketing agency Jarrard Phillips Cate & Hancock, and Binary…

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webinar-covid-19-healthcare-marketing-crisisMost industries will be forever changed by the COVID-19 pandemic, with healthcare near the top of the list. Is your marketing team adjusting your strategy and preparing your brand for life after the coronavirus?

We brought together Reed Smith, Vice President of Digital Services at healthcare marketing agency Jarrard Phillips Cate & Hancock, and Binary Fountain’s Senior Vice President of Marketing, Aaron Clifford, to analyze current crisis communications strategies and look at the future of healthcare marketing in the wake of COVID-19.

In our latest webinar, they discuss monitoring and engaging with the online conversation, building long-term trust with patients and communities, and coming changes to the digital marketing landscape.

Here are some of the topics they covered:

  • Tracking the online conversation surrounding COVID-19 and updates to third-party listings
  • How to tailor healthcare communications strategies in this new environment
  • What the coronavirus outbreak means for the future of healthcare marketing

Here are some key takeaways:

On Healthcare Communications Strategies in a Crisis

Now that healthcare organizations are past the milestones that come first in a crisis situation, like changes in visitation policies and service availability, they’ve moved into highlighting the frontline providers and heroes we’re seeing across the country. Healthcare marketers do this anyway, but now is an opportunity to amplify those supportive campaigns and feature your health experts. Consumers already trust local healthcare providers more than news sources and national organizations, so having these heroes as spokespeople will boost confidence in providers from their communities.

Some physicians – especially in elective care – are not as busy now, creating an opportunity to tap into staff who are media-trained and not seeing as many patients as before. Burnout is very real in this new healthcare environment, so it’s important to still be cognizant of what you ask of staff.

On Building Long-Term Trust Through Social Channels

Transparency is essential to building trust, so organizations need to honestly communicate their short-term and long-term plans for managing the crisis on all relevant third-party platforms. Beyond explicit communications, the healthcare industry is realizing the value of updating listings to accurately reflect hour changes, location closures, testing sites and other essential information.

It’s also important to focus on brand reputation alignment for the future. More comments are coming into healthcare brands through social channels than before; and though traffic will eventually decrease, the current influx of online engagement likely will help long-tail organic search results. Marketers that find ways to maximize content that is currently attracting engagements can improve the foundation of their online reputation for the long term.

On the Future of Healthcare Marketing Post-COVID-19

We are moving into a new normal for marketing and won’t be able to backtrack once the crisis subsides. If you are spending more time answering questions on Facebook or promoting telemedicine, that will turn into the new expectation from healthcare consumers.

Looking ahead, healthcare marketers will need to field many questions around billing and service availability. It’s important to start communicating about suspended specialties and elective services as they start to come back online. With so many consumers looking to local providers and hospitals to answer their medical questions – along with pent up demand for elective procedures – timely communication around those changes will become a necessity in the coming months.

For more insights and advice, click here to watch the on-demand webinar.

 

For more on reputation management during the coronavirus health crisis, you can visit our COVID-19 Resources Page and read these articles:

About the Author

Kieran McQuilkin
Content Marketing Specialist

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April 13, 2020

SEO Trends in Healthcare: Optimize Your Website for Search Engines

By: Kieran McQuilkin

Healthcare search engine optimization (SEO) for practices and hospitals is continually changing. Almost monthly, Google and other search engines are changing their algorithms to continually improve search results for users. Today, you aren’t able to manipulate the algorithms like you used to and get to the top of page one. SEO takes hard work, especially…

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seo-trends-healthcareHealthcare search engine optimization (SEO) for practices and hospitals is continually changing. Almost monthly, Google and other search engines are changing their algorithms to continually improve search results for users.

Today, you aren’t able to manipulate the algorithms like you used to and get to the top of page one. SEO takes hard work, especially in an industry where Google has more strict guidelines for what appears in search results.

To have a successful healthcare SEO strategy today, you need a great user experience on your site, quality customer reviews and a grasp of what customers really want.

We are breaking down some of the most important things to keep in mind while planning a SEO strategy in 2020 and beyond.

In this article, we will cover:

  • How coronavirus changed consumer search behavior
  • Why site performance matters and how to optimize it
  • The impact of online reviews on search engine results

Coronavirus: Understanding the Impact on Consumer Behavior

When the coronavirus swept through the world, consumer priorities and mindsets shifted considerably. With that change, we’ve seen some massive swings in what consumers are searching for and what they are doing online.

While this story is still developing in the United States, organizations’ projections for organic search traffic are already significantly off for the year. Some websites are reporting anywhere from 25% to 40% estimated traffic loss from the channel.

In order to understand what kind of impact the pandemic is having on your website, be sure to look at your website analytics and compare both week over week and the same date range as the previous year. This should give you some idea on how the consumer mindset is impacting your practice, as well as what your traffic potential looks like throughout the year.

Depending on your specialty, you may very well see your traffic on the rise if you run an inpatient medical facility. The inverse might be true for an outpatient facility for elective medical care. Take these trends into account when projecting revenue from the channel and try to develop unique landing pages and content that can help users during this time of crisis.

Remember, it isn’t about getting business; it’s about putting patients first.

Site Performance Matters – A Lot

For years, Google has been warning webmasters that site performance (load times, accessibility, backlinks etc.) matters when they determine which pages show up in search results.

Today, just having a mobile-optimized website isn’t going to cut it. That’s just the cost of doing business.

Google counts consumer experience and website performance as important metrics for healthcare SEO rankings. This is because they want to provide the best user experience for their searchers, so that they continue to use Google instead of other search engines.

User engagement and performance metrics are good indicators of a quality website, while a high bounce rate or low time on site shows the search result was not helpful to the user. Google takes these into account when determining what pages show up on top of search results.

If you want to get more organic traffic, you can start by testing your website’s speed and benchmarking against competitors’ properties with this free tool from Google.

Once you’ve done that, here are some other recommendations to make sure your website is being graded well for performance:

  • Make sure your images have descriptive alt text for screen readers.
  • Make sure you are interlinking relevant pages on your site to other areas, ensuring that your pages are all connected in some way.
  • Make sure you are following appropriate heading structures.
  • Make sure you are using lazy loading images so mobile users see a page quicker.
  • Make sure you are publishing quality, unique content on your site that makes users want to engage with the content, not just bounce off your page.

This should give you a leg up against your competition in the search engine results pages (SERPs).

Your Online Reputation Matters

Now that we’ve established a good technical baseline for your site’s health, it’s time to focus on improving your online presence through reputation management.

If you run a practice or are in healthcare marketing, you know how difficult it can be to market a practice online, especially with all the listings out there. It’s not easy to keep up with Google and Facebook updates, let alone industry-specific listings like Healthgrades or Vitals. These may seem like a pain, but they play a very important role in rankings and in building trust with potential patients.

Today, patients trust online reviews as much as they trust a personal referral, so what patients say online matters for not only patient acquisition, but also for search engines to see if you are the best possible result for their users.

To start, you will want to make sure you follow our guide on how to set up a Google my Business profile and our Facebook business profile guide.

Once you have accurate listings set up for all of your locations, you’ll need to start collecting patient reviews and responding to both the good, bad and ugly parts of patient feedback. The key here is being an active participant in the conversation.

Always offer to do better when you fall short of meeting customer expectations and be grateful when patients leave positive reviews. From there, be sure to create listings on industry-specific listings like ReferralMD, Healthgrades and ZocDoc.

Need Help Getting Started with SEO?

If you need help in your quest to get to the top of the SERPs, you’ve come to the right place. At Binary Fountain, we help practices just like yours win the local search game through our reputation management software.

You can manage all of your local citations and business listings while also taking control of the narrative online by responding to patient reviews, all in one place.

To get started, check out one of our free webinars or learn more about our reputation management software specifically designed for healthcare.

About the Author

Kieran McQuilkin
Content Marketing Specialist

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April 09, 2020

Covid-19 Testing Facilities: Ways to Inform Consumers About Local Test Availability

By: Kieran McQuilkin

More people than you’d expect are confused about what to do if they think they have COVID-19, due constant changes and mixed messages. If your healthcare organization runs COVID-19 testing facilities – and even if it doesn’t – your patients and communities rely on local information to consider their options. In a recent ReviveHealth survey, nearly two-thirds of people said they don’t have enough or any information…

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covid-19-testing-local citationsMore people than you’d expect are confused about what to do if they think they have COVID-19, due constant changes and mixed messages. If your healthcare organization runs COVID-19 testing facilities – and even if it doesn’t – your patients and communities rely on local information to consider their options.

In a recent ReviveHealth survey, nearly two-thirds of people said they don’t have enough or any information on the testing process, while just 30% know where to go. If you provide coronavirus-related services or testing, it’s imperative that your website and content reflect that.

Healthcare communicators and marketers need to regularly post updates to websites, email lists, third-party listings and social media channels so communities know your role in testing and treatments.

In this article, we’ll cover ways for healthcare marketers to provide updated, accurate information about COVID-19 testing facilities and other services related to the disease outbreak.

Add Testing Information to Your Website

One of the first steps is to display a banner or alert message on your organization’s websites and local pages. Include information about your COVID-19 services, testing capabilities, important community updates, and call-to-action buttons guide users to the correct pages or contact information.

You can take this a step further by building new landing pages with information about how prospective patients can get in touch or come in to get tested. Some organizations are also using live chat functionality on their sites to answer specific questions.

Social distancing has led to myriad reschedules and cancellations for nonessential in-person healthcare appointments as consumers avoid medical facilities and providers focus on patients infected by COVID-19. If your organization offers telemedicine, now is a good time to promote those services on your website. Many insurance plans have introduced changes to accommodate telehealth and telemedicine

With all of your web content, consider FAQs and provide specific answers to avoid a flood of phone calls and contact forms. Marketers should anticipate these questions related to coronavirus testing facilities:

  • What are COVID-19 symptoms, and should I get tested?
  • Should I stay home if my symptoms are minor?
  • Is telemedicine an appropriate first step?
  • Should I go to my primary care doctor, an urgent care center, or the local hospital?
  • Where in our community can I get tested?
  • Which hospitals near me can take new patients?

If your website lists information on testing facilities or drive-thru testing locations, you can use this structured data format from schema.org to alert search engines that you have coronavirus-specific capabilities. Don’t forget to also answer these frequent questions on physician profile pages to make sure searchers are aware of your providers’ specialties, services and hours, even if unrelated to COVID-19.

Engage Consumers on Social Media

Once you have updated information and answers to testing FAQs on your website, use social media to drive people in your community to your appropriate pages or posts.

Post real-time updates on your Facebook, Twitter and other social media platforms with a consistent message about COVID-19 testing facilities and availability. With so many working from home, people are engaging more frequently with social media and seeking information from local healthcare experts.

Remember, Facebook and Instagram algorithms favor personal accounts over business pages, so as few as 4% of your organization’s followers will see your organic posts there. Consider paid social to spread geographically targeted information about your COVID-19 services beyond your usual audience.

Keep in mind that Twitter is (by far and away) the most-used platform for coronavirus comments related to brands, according to Binary Fountain’s platform data. If nothing else, marketers should pin a coronavirus announcement or website link to the top of their Twitter profiles as soon as possible.

Your marketing team can also consider publishing COVID-19 Google Posts and other short content with recent announcements and relevant information, such as links to CDC and WHO information about coronavirus testing.

Display Testing Facilities on Third-Party Listings

In this crisis, third-party listings can be just as important as your own webpages. Make sure to edit or remove inaccurate business listings wherever they arise, especially concerning hours of operation and available medical services.

Attributes to monitor across all third-party directories include hours of operation, addresses, phone numbers, available services, contact information for different departments and specialties, and business descriptions that include COVID-19-related capabilities.

You should also consider leveraging other sites that are being created to screen patients virtually and offer testing site information. Google sister company Verily launched a website to screen people who might have COVID-19 and point them toward active testing locations, and Apple created a COVID-19 Screening Tool in conjunction with the CDC.

Leverage Google My Business

In addition to the Verily screening site, Google has launched several features to help healthcare organizations display testing capabilities.

The search engine has slightly relaxed guidelines for COVID-19-related business listings, temporarily allowing small edits to your business name for unique services like virtual visits, drive-thru testing or curbside prescription pickup.

For health organizations specifically, you can add COVID-19 announcements to your website markup that signal to search engines that you have testing centers available. These announcements can include the closure of facilities, rescheduling of events, and new services for medical facilities. Many healthcare providers can now also add “COVID-19 info link” and “Telehealth info link” attributes to their GMB profiles.

For more on reputation management during the coronavirus health crisis, you can visit our COVID-19 Resources Page and browse these articles:

 

About the Author

Kieran McQuilkin
Content Marketing Specialist

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