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September 20, 2019

3 Takeaways from the Google Review Rich Snippet Update

By: Kayla Zamary

You may not be seeing as many star ratings for local businesses appear on Google SERPs in the near future. According to Google’s Webmaster blog, Google has recently updated their algorithm to significantly limit the schema types that will trigger review rich results in a search. While goods like movies and books will still show…

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google review rich resultsYou may not be seeing as many star ratings for local businesses appear on Google SERPs in the near future. According to Google’s Webmaster blog, Google has recently updated their algorithm to significantly limit the schema types that will trigger review rich results in a search.

While goods like movies and books will still show star ratings alongside their Google Reviews, any first-party ratings for businesses and organizations will likely be removed. This is because Google believes there are too many “self-serving” first-party reviews created by businesses to artificially boost their own ratings.

The Google Webmaster further explains, “in the past, an entity like a business or an organization could add review markup about themselves to their home page or another page and often cause a review snippet to show for that page. That markup could have been added directly by the entity or embedded through the use of a third-party widget. We consider this ‘self-serving’ because the entity itself has chosen to add the markup to its own pages, about its own business or organization.”

Although first-party reviews will not be displayed on a company’s organic SERP, third-party review sites like Healthgrades or Apartments.com will continue to be allowed to display star ratings for that business.

Here’s how this will look for businesses

google review rich results

The star ratings listed for this company are being drawn directly from the company website. Google does not see these ratings as trustworthy or valid, as it would be coming from an unbiased source, so they will not appear.

google review rich results

However, the data that is being used in this next example is being pulled directly from Google Reviews. Google trusts the validity of its own product, so these ratings will remain.

google review rich results

Likewise, the star ratings for this store are being pulled from data on a third-party social media platform, which Google trusts to regulate and provide valid results.

What does this mean for my search strategy?

Although this is a change that businesses and organizations must recognize and make adjustments for, the algorithm update is not expected to have a drastic impact on their overall search strategy.

Listings and reputation management experts from Binary Fountain have identified a few areas of concern once these changes are fully implemented:

  • Search Visibility – First-party reviews often represent a low effort way to provide a constant flow of fresh, localized content for each specific business listing. Removing these ratings could diminish this benefit.
  • Click-Thru Rates (CTR) – The biggest advantage of review rich snippets is the impact on CTR from SERPs. Without the star ratings from rich snippets, companies may see a decline in click-thrus and will have to find other drivers to meet their goals.
  • Conversion Rates – On-page review content has been shown to increase conversion rates due to increased trust. The absence of the review snippet may negatively impact how a business builds trust online.

Despite these potential hiccups for Google SERPs, there are a few things that businesses should keep in mind:

  • Content is (Still) King – Content, especially when localized with landmarks and attractions frequently mentioned in reviews, can be an excellent way to improve a company’s ranking in organic search results. This benefit remains regardless of Google’s changes to rich snippets.
  • Visibility of Rich Results Doesn’t Change Rankings – Though the information within a company’s SERP may change, that ultimately does not affect where a company is ranking on Google. Businesses must still put in the same amount of time and effort on SEO and developing high-ranking content to improve search visibility. Likewise, even though first-party ratings will not be displayed, the content helps SEO overall.
  • Conversions are Influenced By Many Review Factors – In theory, businesses are already benefiting from higher conversion rates from customers that see and interact with reviews hosted on third-party widgets. But regardless of whether a review is from a first-party host or third-party host, if the content of the reviews is primarily negative, the conversion rate will still decrease. Ideally, brands would be responding to any negative reviews on all platforms anyways to demonstrate their concern for the customer experience and their willingness to improve based on constructive feedback.

While people are often quick to panic once Google announces a sweeping change to their policies, there is no need for alarm with the implementation of this new update. Many of the things that companies are already doing, like investing in listings solutions and optimizing content for the web, are things that will continue to work and avoid any pitfalls this new update may bring.

Binary Fountain is committed to monitoring this update as it is rolled out to ensure it doesn’t negatively impact our customers, and we will provide service and support if something changes for our clients.

Please submit any questions or concerns you may have about these changes to your Binary Fountain account manager and we will be happy to assist however we can.

About the Author

Kayla Zamary
Marketing Manager

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September 18, 2019

5 Mistakes That Can Seriously Damage Your Reputation – and What You Can Do to Avoid Them

By: Zargham Ghani

What should you do with a negative online review? You must respond promptly – and correctly – or the situation could get out of hand, spiraling into an unwanted public argument that can torch the provider’s online reputation and even invite legal troubles. Here are five online reputation management mistakes that can have devastating consequences,…

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online reputationWhat should you do with a negative online review? You must respond promptly – and correctly – or the situation could get out of hand, spiraling into an unwanted public argument that can torch the provider’s online reputation and even invite legal troubles.

Here are five online reputation management mistakes that can have devastating consequences, and some simple ways to avoid them.

  1. Allow the physician to respond (Don’t. Seriously, DON’T!)

If the response to a bad review comes directly from the doctor, what began as a patient relations challenge can easily turn troublesome. Having the physician discuss a complaint risks escalating a bad review into a back-and-forth public exchange. 

It’s better to 1) onboard them to how marketing can handle engaging reviews; 2) tactfully inform the physician that a bad review has appeared; 3) keep them away from the keyboard, and 4) update them as you move offline to discuss and resolve the matter with the unhappy patient.

In the long term, the best way to prevent online confrontations is to adopt a transparency initiative that actively engages physicians in the review process.

  1. Have no written policy for responding to reviews

Patient reviews and social media comments are now the norm in healthcare, so it is vital to have a written policy in place for responding to reviews, positive or negative. 

A timely, effective response depends on your staff knowing who is assigned to monitor reviews, what legal pitfalls to look for (libel, Protected Health Information, HIPAA violations, etc.), who will respond and how the response will be tailored. A thorough, well-rounded policy with response templates offers confidence that every review will receive a prompt and appropriate answer.

  1. Respond too slowly to a negative review – or ignore it altogether

Address both positive and negative reviews within two business days. If the review is negative, reach out to the patient as soon as possible and assist them in contacting a patient relations staffer instead of discussing the issue online. Waiting too long to respond will likely further frustrate the patient. A complaint that goes unanswered tells the world your practice doesn’t care about patients.

Binary Fountain provides the platform and best practices for healthcare marketers looking to engage patient reviews harvested from over 100 online sources, including social media, review sites, advocacy forums, blogs and other sources.

  1. Make a bad review worse by pursuing the conversation online or arguing with the patient

It’s tempting to come to the defense of your practice by justifying the steps that led to a complaint or dispute regarding the patient’s account. Don’t start a public conversation that could reveal Protected Health Information (PHI), or draw unwanted attention to the issue before there’s a chance to seek resolution.

  1. Allow a HIPAA violation

HIPAA privacy rule violations can occur even where the intentions are the best. Online reviews heighten the risk. One medical practice paid a fine recently when an online post describing a positive medical outcome – which didn’t name the patient – was judged to have revealed enough personal information to make their identity obvious to neighbors in the small town where the patient lived. 

For reviews that have legal implications, such as revealing PHI, develop a policy and process with your legal department that includes contacting them immediately for advice on reaching out to the patient about their issue and request that the comment is removed.

Interested in more content like this? Check out these related articles:

 

 

About the Author

Zargham Ghani
Engagement Manager

Zargham help healthcare organizations better understand their healthcare consumer challenges and needs, in order to efficiently manage and improve patient satisfaction.

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September 17, 2019

4 Great Google My Business Features to Utilize

By: Kayla Zamary

Curating your online presence is imperative for making it easier for customers to find your business and putting your best foot forward when they do. Google My Business is a fantastic tool for not only ensuring that potential customers can find your business, but also helping you communicate directly with them. This article covers some…

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Curating your online presence is imperative for making it easier for customers to find your business and putting your best foot forward when they do. Google My Business is a fantastic tool for not only ensuring that potential customers can find your business, but also helping you communicate directly with them.

This article covers some of the best features to use to enhance your profile.

What is Google My Business?  

 As we’ve discussed before, Google My Business was launched by Google in 2014 as a way to provide enhanced search results for local business, especially once search from mobile devices increased.  

From Google’s perspective, giving business owners a listing on their website gave them the ability to enhance their search results and provide the most value to the customer, ensuring they remained the kings of search, while at the same time allowing them to collect data without having to go through third parties. 

Currently, Google My Business is a free marketing tool available to any business owner or head of marketing, but one study suggests very few businesses are taking advantage of it, which means using it could give you a leg up compared to your competition.  

If you need help setting up Google My Business check out our guide on how to get started. 

Taking advantage of Google My Business features will help you attract new customers, build a community and learn how consumers interact with your business online. 

  1. My Business Insights: Data at Your Fingertips 

 In today’s data and consumer driven decision making, information is power.  

 Google’s My Business insights dashboard provides a huge array of information that can be helpful to any business, including how many people have seen your listing and some of the top searches they have used to find you.  

 For example, you are able to see if people are using branded searches to find your business or if they are using discovery-based searches like “urgent care near me.” 

You can also use Business Insights to track what kind of activities people are doing, including:  

  • Direction requests to your location 
  • Click to calls 
  • Visits to your website from your listing 
  • Reviewing and responding to online reviews 

With these kinds of insights, you can better understand consumer sentiment towards your business, and where to focus your digital marketing efforts.  

Pay particular interest to the online reviews section. Online reviews help you better understand what operational areas you could improve in to increase your star rating  

  1. FAQs 

When you are a business owner, you get a lot of questions, especially by people who are online. One of the best features of Google My Business is being able to answer questions users have publicly, so you don’t have to answer the same question multiple times. This FAQ section helps both you and your customers reduce confusion and save time getting important answers.  

Seeding common questions is recommended for businesses to get a leg up on the types of inquiries customers will likely make. Some examples of these common questions include details about business hours, parking and location info, specific services and products, and appointment reservation requirements. If you are struggling to come up with questions to answer, take note of questions you get asked over the phone and in person and include them in your Google Q&A section. If one person wants to know something, chances are that others will, too. 

 Finally, looking at the FAQ section can also help you get a better idea of what parts of your site or listing are confusing, so think about making changes if the same type of questions keep getting asked. 

  1. Google Posts

Google Posts was originally introduced in 2017, but they have since become a big part of how business owners are connecting with their audience. While its prominence has decreased since its launch, Posts is still a good way of highlighting emergency updates, new products or seasonal offers. 

In addition to helping make announcements, using Google Posts may improve your SEO by building up location authority. 

There are four different types of Google Posts: 

  • Product: posts that highlight a specific product that include a picture of the product and a CTA 
  • What’s New: general information or breaking news about your business 
  • Event: posts about upcoming events your business is involved in 
  • Special Offers: posts about promotional sales 

To learn more about Google Posts, check out Google’s guide. 

  1. Book an Appointment

 For people searching for a service-based business, there is a feature on Google My Business that allows users to book appointments or make reservations online. All you have to do is set up the feature and a user who clicks on the URL will be redirected to your website’s calendar.  

This is a specifically good feature for doctors, hairdressers and utility workers. 

Your Presence Online Matters 

These are just a couple Google My Business features you may not be taking advantage of, though it will serve you well to explore all of them to find the features that will serve your business the best. If you aren’t paying attention to your online presence or reputation, there’s no time like the present to start! 

Interested in this topic? Here are some related articles:

 

 

About the Author

Kayla Zamary
Marketing Manager

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September 12, 2019

3 Ways Online Reviews and Surveys Can Help Your Practice or Hospital

By: George LaDue

Patient feedback is changing the business of healthcare. It’s playing a significant role in digital consumerism as 75% of patients today are leveraging online reviews to select a provider. Healthcare systems are also going through a shift as many now see online reviews and surveys as an asset for helping them improve patient experience —…

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online reviews and surveysPatient feedback is changing the business of healthcare. It’s playing a significant role in digital consumerism as 75% of patients today are leveraging online reviews to select a provider.

Healthcare systems are also going through a shift as many now see online reviews and surveys as an asset for helping them improve patient experience — and attract and retain patients.

The opportunities for patient feedback to impact a healthcare organization are numerous. Here are three ways you can apply online reviews and patient surveys to help your health system.

  1. Boost Appointment Requests from Physician Directory Pages

As online reviews increasingly affect consumer care choices, healthcare organizations can gain a competitive advantage by publishing them to their physician web pages. Online reviews can significantly impact your rankings in search engines, which search results get clicked on, and consumer purchasing decisions. 

Publishing verified, rich patient survey comments to your physician directory webpages can help increase SEO and attract consumers seeking a physician. Physician directory pages with online ratings and reviews typically generate more online engagement and physician appointment requests than those without them.

  1. Increase Physician, Staff and Patient Engagement

As patients increasingly embrace their role as consumers and seek out reviews before choosing a provider, it becomes ever more important for healthcare organizations to engage with patients online. Encouraging patient feedback is crucial to capturing valuable insights for your practice. Urge patients to participate in online review sites to create more reviews and use those insights to create a patient-centered culture and increase staff engagement in your practice. 

To foster friendly competition amongst physicians, benchmark their performance and share results with them. You may even consider rewarding employees recognized for receiving positive feedback from patients.

  1. Implement Patient Experience Improvements

Take advantage of the opportunity to listen, analyze and act on the plethora of feedback available as patients become increasingly vocal about their care experiences. Adopting digital surveys can provide a significant pathway to collecting patient feedback and can save time by helping healthcare professionals quickly analyze trends and comments. 

Practices can capture more meaningful feedback with digital surveys today and implement those insights to improve their practice and increase ROI tomorrow.

About the Author

George LaDue
Sales Director

George helps healthcare organizations better understand their healthcare consumer challenges and needs, in order to efficiently manage and improve patient satisfaction.

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September 11, 2019

NPS Scores vs Reputation Management Solutions

By: Kayla Zamary

For many years, companies have relied on Net Promoter Scores (NPS) to measure customer satisfaction, engagement, and sentiment towards their organization. While NPS is a great tool for measuring the difference between positive and negative sentiment, NPS does not give you the complete picture you need to make data-driven decisions for improving your operations, product,…

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nps scoreFor many years, companies have relied on Net Promoter Scores (NPS) to measure customer satisfaction, engagement, and sentiment towards their organization.

While NPS is a great tool for measuring the difference between positive and negative sentiment, NPS does not give you the complete picture you need to make data-driven decisions for improving your operations, product, and reputation. Looking at your reputation management score and your NPS will give you the actionable insights you need to deliver better customer service and continue to build brand loyalty.

We will look at the differences between reputation management and NPS and how to leverage them to get the most value for your organization.

What are Net Promoter Scores?

Net Promoter Score is a single metric measuring the difference between your company’s promoters and detractors.

In other words, it’s the difference between the people who are willing to highly recommend your business minus the people who have a negative sentiment towards your business. This gives you a singular metric on a hundred-point scale to assess your current customer engagement.

Higher scores reflect an organization’s ability to not only exceed customer expectations but limit the number of detractors. For example, if your company has 72% promoters, 10% neutral and 18% detractors, your NPS is 54 (72-18).

Benefits of Paying Attention to NPS Scores

There are many benefits to tracking your NPS score.

It’s a pretty simple formula that everyone in your organization can understand, which makes it approachable for even the most data averse.

NPS can tell you if the people who didn’t recommend your business are truly unhappy (detractor) or just wouldn’t recommend you (neutral). That is valuable because it can help inform just how negative your overall reputation is in the marketplace or if you are just barely meeting expectations.

In other words, you get a quick picture of just how many people are lukewarm to your business vs. highly frustrated and unlikely to recommend you to a friend or colleague.

Why NPS Scores are Incomplete

Net promoter score can be a very valuable tool, but it doesn’t give organizations the level of detail they need to make truly informed business decisions. More data points are needed to better understand how to improve your operations and ultimately meet customer expectations.

Additionally, a higher NPS score used to be a go-to measure of consumer engagement, especially in retail businesses. Today, however, most customers use star ratings and third-party review sites to choose a business or product.

Knowing that 20% of your customers are detractors is useful, but it does not help you develop strategies to correct the issues.

How Are Reputation Management Solutions Different?

Reputation management solutions often include a lot of different components aggregated into a singular platform. Typically, this platform is going to help organizations:

  • Create and publish star ratings from multiple platforms
  • Increase engagement by responding to reviews and social media
  • Improve customer sentiment
  • Boost total review volume
  • Build a better employer brand by listening to employees

As you can see, this is a much more comprehensive list of KPIs that your organization should focus on rather than a pass or fail metric. This is what gives you a much clearer picture of what you need to work on to improve your customer experience.

Note: Every industry is going to be a little different. For example, healthcare organizations will want to measure physician communication or ease of appointments as a KPI, while a restaurant may look at food quality or server attentiveness as their success criteria.

Reputation Management Solutions vs NPS Score

In order to make truly data-driven decisions, companies need deeper and more comprehensive insights into what areas of frustration customers are feeling.

Unlike an NPS score, which gives you a high-level view of if you are doing something right or wrong, a comprehensive reputation management solution gives you a clear picture on what is working or not working for you, and will usually give you the ability to compare your success to your competitors.

For example, a 3.8-star rating allows you to analyze the component information provided in online reviews, which can then be used to improve your areas of deficiency and get the leg up on your competition.

Simply put, a reputation management solution gives you a holistic view of your businesses’ reputation that provides the actionable insights you need to improve the customer experience that NPS doesn’t cover.

Do You Want to Improve Your Online Reputation?

Managing your online reputation can be a difficult task if you don’t have all the right tools at your disposal. Your staff does not have time to review all the comments customers are making about your business online. And if they do see some, they don’t know how to categorize the comments for review and action.

Reputation management solutions make keeping track of all of your online reviews easy by automating the process and putting all of your review data in one place and giving you real-time reporting for your convenience. You can quickly see if your areas for improvement are problems with things like quality, accessibility, communication, facilities, or staff attitude because we can provide comparison information for other organizations.

About the Author

Kayla Zamary
Marketing Manager

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September 10, 2019

3 Common Google Analytics Mistakes (And How to Fix Them)

By: Kayla Zamary

Big data isn’t optional in today’s data-driven marketplace: it’s the cost of doing business. Google Analytics is one of the best tools out there to track how customers are interacting with your business online. With real-time reporting, transaction tracking and other features, Google Analytics is a must for businesses to get the consumer insights they…

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google analyticsBig data isn’t optional in today’s data-driven marketplace: it’s the cost of doing business.

Google Analytics is one of the best tools out there to track how customers are interacting with your business online. With real-time reporting, transaction tracking and other features, Google Analytics is a must for businesses to get the consumer insights they need to measure success.

While Google Analytics is a fairly simple tool for companies to use, there are a few metrics or features that are easily misunderstood if you don’t have a lot of training or expertise in the API. Making decisions based on inaccurate data can be even more detrimental to your business than having no data at all!

Look out for these common Google Analytics mistakes to make sure you are getting the most out of your data.

You’re Only Analyzing Sampled Data

This is a big one if you want the most accurate data possible and don’t necessarily care if you get it in a timely fashion.

Sometimes, Google Analytics will sample data, or give a snapshot of data over a time period, instead of looking at all of the underlying metrics. This subset of data is easier for the system to pull and reduces the amount of wait time for the person pulling the data.

While this is a common data-analysis practice, it’s really meant to uncover meaningful information from a larger data set rather than giving you the exact number that was tracked in the system.

Think about it like a guessing game of how many marshmallows are in a jar. If you are sure the marshmallows are all the same size and know the rough dimensions of the jar, you should be able to get a rough estimate, but there could be other factors at play that would change the actual number.

This will greatly impact the way you report numbers, as there is a chance the answer will change over a long time period, so your numbers from one month may not look the same, even if you are pulling them for the same time period.

This won’t be a problem for many businesses, but when it does happen, it can greatly change your total revenue or website traffic reporting.

You may be experiencing sampled reporting if:

  • You have over 500k sessions going to your website for the requested date range (Standard Google Analytics).
  • You have over 100M sessions at the selected date range (Google Analytics 360)
  • If you have too many segments applied to a timeline
  • If you are looking at the multi-channel or assisted conversion reports

You should be able to tell if your data is being sampled by looking at the little shield the top of your report. If it is green and has a checkmark, your data is not being sampled. If it is orange, your data is being sampled.

How and When to Fix it:

If you have a high-level executive or business owner who wants the exact revenue or lead number, you will want to have the data unsampled. An unsampled report measures all the data from a given time range.

To do this, go to the top right corner of your report and click the unsampled button. Google Analytics will notify you when your report is ready.

Note: This can take a few minutes, so don’t wait to do it before a big presentation!

You’re Not Utilizing Behavior Flow Reports

The behavior flow report helps you visualize the different paths your users take on your website. This enables you to see what pages people enter your site on and where they go from there.

This can help you identify pages that are not functioning how they should or aren’t driving people to pages you want them to get to.

To access this powerful report, click on “Behavior” from your GA dashboard and go down to the Behavior Flow report. It will look something like this:

The key here is to pay attention to the connecting lines between pages to see precisely which pages visitors are clicking on from other landing pages. If you hover over the red area of the report, you will see the number of users dropping off of that page.

This report is can be extremely clunky or overwhelming to look at, so many mistakes can be made while analyzing it, or you could end up looking at the wrong things.

What to do with this report:

Your team should look at the content or UX of a page where you have the highest drop-off points and determine what improvements need to be made to ensure users complete the desired action.

The answer may be as simple as removing pages that have high drop-off rates if they are causing friction for your customers.

You’re Looking at Bounce Rates the Wrong Way

Bounce rate is something that most marketers and even operational employees understand. It is the percentage of people that visit a page and then leave without viewing any more pages on that site.

You obviously want to have a low bounce rate because it means your users are engaging with additional content on your site.

A high bounce rate is a bad thing, right?

Not always.

How you measure bounce rate should really vary from page to page. If a user lands on a page where they are expected to fill out a form and leave the site, having a higher than average bounce rate should be expected.

How to use bounce rate:

In the end, the proper way to measure the bounce rate is to look at the purpose of the page and set up standards for how you want to measure success.

  • For content-based pages, you will want to aim for around a 20-55% bounce rate
  • For single-action pages, aim for 56-70%
  • For other informational pages, 40-60% is fairly normal
  • Anything above 70% should be viewed as an opportunity for improvement

Powerful Data at Your Finger Tips

Getting comfortable with Google Analytics is a must for any marketer or business owner who wants to get the customer insights they need to improve their online experience.

Google Analytics isn’t the only tool you need to measure your customer’s online interactions: you also need a reputation management program to measure consumer sentiment towards your business. What people are saying about your company online greatly impacts your ability to attract new customers, retain your current clients and even appear in local search results.

Coupling Google Analytics and online reputation management software will guarantee you have the tools you need to fully understand how customers interact with your business online.

If you’re interested in other Google topics, check out these related articles:

About the Author

Kayla Zamary
Marketing Manager

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September 05, 2019

Ask an Expert: Root Cause Analysis

By: Kayla Zamary

In this series, Binary Fountain offers its staff expertise to answer common questions about online reputation management. In this post, Binary Fountain’s Director of Product Management, Pallavi Kapnadak tackles questions related to the new Root Cause Analysis feature. What is the new Root Cause Analysis feature from Binary Fountain? It’s a completely new feature that…

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root cause analysisIn this series, Binary Fountain offers its staff expertise to answer common questions about online reputation management.

In this post, Binary Fountain’s Director of Product Management, Pallavi Kapnadak tackles questions related to the new Root Cause Analysis feature.

What is the new Root Cause Analysis feature from Binary Fountain?

It’s a completely new feature that we have on our platform and it allows users to drill down into patient experience and identify the root cause of either a physician’s or location’s performance based on analysis of unstructured feedback.

Now, when I say location or physicians, it really can also scale up to higher levels, so that you could roll up a group of physicians together into one location or bring several locations together into a region, simply by applying a hierarchy filter. The way it works is that we have a Natural Language Processing (NLP) tool that analyzes direct feedback from surveys or online reviews, and then it goes through and generates insights and sentiments. Then, these insights and sentiments are tied to our 63 themes that are spread across eight categories, which are then displayed on the root cause analysis dashboard.

We do go a step further, in the sense that we tie everything to those themes and categories, but then we also identify what we call “sub-themes.” With each insight from a comment, we can also identify a sub-theme that falls within that broader general theme. When all of that is done and presented on the dashboard, it allows patient experience professionals the opportunity to analyze the insights and the breakdown of patient sentiment across all of these themes and categories. They can also apply the filters to look at it at different levels of the organizational hierarchy, like from an executive-level or manager level.

Themes can also be customized. If we see that sudden sub-themes don’t fall under those themes we’ll capture this under the “general” theme and then at the end of the year, we’ll go and identify new themes from those. We are looking to continuously update our themes and categories.

What pain point does this solve for clients?

The ultimate purpose is to identify areas of improvement and areas of strength within an organization. So knowing that an organization is collecting all of these comments from surveys or from online reviews, they can use that to quickly identify which area should be improved on and which are the areas where they’re really doing well.

One of the other things we’ve done is come up with a reporting feature and that essentially is doing the work for you. If users are too busy to check the dashboard manually, they just click on that report button and it’ll highlight the top five areas of improvement and the top area five areas of strength as well.

I think one use case might be that a user comes in, looks to the report and identifies five areas of improvement and decides to have work streams assigned to those areas. Users can monitor those over the course of the year and see the impact of their improvement efforts. They can identify if there was a particular topic that improved or if there’s something new they can zone in on and see if they want to get more information.

You can view things at the brand level and see the conversations, and then narrow the search down to the location level. Food services typically are something which is procured centrally for the entire hospital system, so if people are complaining about that, that’s perhaps something that someone at the brand level can handle it.

It doesn’t just help decision-makers at the top, however–when you go down to the location, the location managers may want to know about things like staffing issues. That’s a local problem that the location manager would want to know about and fix.

Does it have different levels of access? Is it a single sign-in or are there permissions for individual users?

It is customizable. It’s a feature that we can turn on at the client level, but also at the user level, so it really depends on how organizations want to use this. In some places, it’s only the central user that has access to it and then they are generating these reports for the location managers and just mailing it to them on a biweekly basis.

In most situations, I think the hospital systems just prefer all of the location managers to have access to it so they can go in and either drill down and find areas of improvement or generate those reports themselves, so it really depends on how they want to do it.

What is the main purpose of Root Cause Analysis?

I think whether it’s the patient experience team specifically or the marketing team, the ultimate goal is to improve the patient experience. It’s one thing to make sure that a provider is generating patient referrals and improving revenue, but it’s another thing to actually bring more patients in and make sure that they have a good experience.

I think the second purpose is also to maximize the investments from the insurance companies. It works both ways–when you’re trying to make sure that the patient experience is good and your referrals go up, your reimbursements can also go up. With the HCAHP surveys, which are mandated, providers require certain scores for reimbursement. This tool helps that.

Is this a standalone feature or does it augment an existing product?

This is an existing feature that compliments our current product. If we enable it on the back end, specific users will have access in the analyze tab. 

What are some best practices for using this feature?

I think one of the ways is to go into the main analysis dashboard and quickly get a scan of all categories and themes, and then see the positive and negative performance metrics. When users see something as negative, they may want to drill down and look into specific themes within those categories and they can then click on those themes for more detailed information and related sub-themes. 

For example, you may find a patient with a negative experience was seen in a timely manner and the diagnosis was good, but the provider’s bedside manner was lacking. That can impact their loyalty to that provider, so organizations really need to drill down on these issues and create action plans for improvement.

We do have a couple of other features that we’ve built out over the years. We’ve added something called “Demographics,” which allows patient experience themes to drill down into a variety of factors, including age and gender. They can use various patient demographics to slice the data further.

Another cool ability is a filter that helps analyze all of the comments by overall ratings and sentiment. This a good use case for when a provider wants to see comments with 9/10 ratings, but still identify issues that prevented a perfect score. Maybe the front desk staff was rude or the cleanliness of the office facilities was an issue. You can start narrowing down other things that are issues that you may have not identified.

 

 

About the Author

Kayla Zamary
Marketing Manager

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September 04, 2019

Marketing to Millennials

By: Kayla Zamary

Are you marketing your healthcare services to Millennials? If you aren’t, you should reconsider. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Millennials will surpass Baby Boomers as the largest living adult generation sometime this year. Millennials are different Many traits and behaviors distinguish the generation born between 1981 and 1996 (sometimes referenced as between 1980 and 2000)….

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marketing to millenials

Are you marketing your healthcare services to Millennials? If you aren’t, you should reconsider. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Millennials will surpass Baby Boomers as the largest living adult generation sometime this year.

Millennials are different

Many traits and behaviors distinguish the generation born between 1981 and 1996 (sometimes referenced as between 1980 and 2000). These 22-37 year-olds are diverse and inclusive, well educated and much more comfortable with technology than earlier generations. Surveys show that more than 90% Millennials own smartphones, and as consumers, 51% of Millennials are searching for providers on social media.

Marketing to Millennials as Healthcare Consumers

Here are a few data points and insights to consider, several of them courtesy of our recent webinar on marketing to millennials as healthcare consumers:

More than a million Millennials are becoming mothers every year – there are more than 17 million Millennial mothers already.

Because they’re tech-oriented, they check in with “Doctor Google” first. 54% of patients start their search for providers on Google, as opposed to hospital web pages or specialty listings sites.

Millennials often don’t have a primary care provider and sometimes choose to visit urgent care facilities because they find it more convenient. 6 out of 10 support telemedicine to avoid physically visiting a doctor.

They equate healthcare with wellness and might choose to spend more on specialized fitness classes like a cross-training or yoga–an average of $155 per month, according to one report.

When it comes to medical instructions, Millennials show a preference for treatments that feel “necessary” and are easily understood.

Their healthcare experience matters. They want their health provider to help them be healthier every day, but they definitely do not like the traditional appointment setting.

Millennials prefer digital exchange of information that is paperless, and phone call-free. They are more likely to respond to an app, text or email. 2018 alone saw a decrease of 45% in the number of appointments booked by phone, while appointments booked by web page increased by 100%.

Get more advice on marketing to Millennials

Does all this seem like information overload? Well, that’s the Millennial experience, and they are more likely to research their health online than older consumers. They aim to be very educated when it comes to making decisions about their own healthcare. 

Listen to our webinar

For more information on all these points and more, download and watch our on-demand webinar, “Marketing to Millennials as Healthcare Consumers.” Binary Fountain’s SVP of Marketing Aaron Clifford hosts, featuring:

  • Kelly Kavanaugh VP and Chief Strategy Officer at Dayton Children’s Hospital
  • Jordan Howard VP Marketing & Strategy at OM Healthcare

Download this On-Demand Webinar Now!

About the Author

Kayla Zamary
Marketing Manager

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September 03, 2019

2019 Healthcare Consumer Insight & Digital Engagement Survey

By: Kayla Zamary

The online space has become increasingly useful and important for consumer decision-making across all industries, and the past few years have shown that this trend applies to the healthcare industry as well. The importance of online reviews, ratings, and recommendations is on the rise. As a healthcare provider or physician interested in acquiring new patients…

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healthcare consumer surveyThe online space has become increasingly useful and important for consumer decision-making across all industries, and the past few years have shown that this trend applies to the healthcare industry as well.

The importance of online reviews, ratings, and recommendations is on the rise. As a healthcare provider or physician interested in acquiring new patients and improving your brand reputation, you must understand how patients are using search engines, social media, and specialized review sites to make healthcare decisions and share their personal experiences with others.

What Has Changed in Healthcare Consumer Behavior Over The Past Three Years?

The realm of healthcare consumer behavior is multi-faceted. Patients are not looking to just one source of information for insights into a provider’s reputation, nor do they weigh all pieces of data the same way. So, while the overall use of digital tools to find doctors and health centers has skyrocketed over the past three years, there is much more to uncover beneath the surface. Providers require more in-depth knowledge in this realm, including which digital platforms are rising in prominence, what type of information matters to potential patients when researching physician information, and which customer engagement strategies are most effective in this changing space?

Hard numbers help to paint a clearer picture of these key trends and indicate where they might be headed. Binary Fountain presents the findings from our annual consumer survey in this guide, “Binary Fountain’s 2019 Healthcare Consumer Insight & Digital Engagement Survey.” Here you will discover not only the leading behaviors trending in the healthcare consumer space, but also updated statistics with numerical data as well as our analysis based on the last three years of research. This information can help you redirect your online reputation management strategy and develop new patient engagement solutions.

Download the report here to see full results or download the infographic for a quick snapshot of the results.

About the Author

Kayla Zamary
Marketing Manager

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August 29, 2019

Ask an Expert: Google Questions & Answers

By: Kayla Zamary

In this series, Binary Fountain offers its staff expertise to answer common questions about online reputation management. In this post, Binary Fountain Product Manager Jeremy Lowry tackles questions related to managing Google Q&A tools for Google My Business listings at the enterprise level. What’s the importance of the Q&A section in my Google My Business…

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google questions and answers

In this series, Binary Fountain offers its staff expertise to answer common questions about online reputation management.

In this post, Binary Fountain Product Manager Jeremy Lowry tackles questions related to managing Google Q&A tools for Google My Business listings at the enterprise level.

What’s the importance of the Q&A section in my Google My Business Profile?

The Q&A section is a prominent feature on Google My Business (GMB) profiles and factors into search engine visibility, so the more robust and accurate this section is, the better. Additionally, this feature cannot be turned on and off like some other GMB elements. That said, you can still exercise some control over your Q&A info by carefully monitoring its activity and responding to every question and answer posted by customers. After all, if people leave inaccurate information, this can greatly impact your business and mislead potential customers.

One of the most common points of confusion, especially for healthcare providers, involves incorrect business hour information. Someone may ask when you open via Google Q&A and a customer might jump in and say “9 a.m.” when the correct response is actually “8 a.m.” This seemingly small error may cost you an appointment or sale.

Who can post questions, and who can answer?

For better or worse, anyone can post questions and answers for your business. Fortunately, Google makes it clear who is posting this information. For instance, if you own the business, Google will clarify your position in parentheses. Or, anyone who signs up with Google’s Local Guide benefit program will have a little star and the text “local guide” next to their name.

Q&A conversations are also ongoing, like a thread on a message board. Once the question is asked, answers can continue to pile underneath. This is why continual monitoring is key for businesses, even for older, seemingly stale questions. Google now features the most recent question at the top of your GMB profile, so staying up to date on new questions and answers matters, too.

Does a business owner have the ability to flag inappropriate content in Google Q&A?

Yes. Google’s Prohibited and Restricted Content guidelines apply to Q&A forms as well. While you cannot remove the content yourself, you can request for it to be taken down by Google if you feel it violates these rules. This includes content that is off-topic, fake/spam, offensive, sexually explicit, etc. Click here for more information.

How do users know when a business owner has responded to a question?

As mentioned previously, Google will tag you as the “Owner,” helping to identify your answer as the source of truth. As the business owner, you must verify this information before receiving this title, however. Neglecting this feature is a missed opportunity to steer potential online customers in the right direction.

Can you solicit questions to answer?

Yes, and in fact, seeding common questions is recommended for businesses to get a leg up on the types of inquiries customers will likely make. Some examples of these common questions include details about business hours, parking and location info, specific services and products, and appointment reservation requirements. If you are struggling to come up with questions to answer, take note of questions you get asked over the phone and in person and include them in your Google Q&A section. If one person wants to know something, chances are that others will, too.

How does Binary Fountain’s new Google Question and Answer product make monitoring and responding to Google Q&A easier? 

The main benefit of Binary Fountain’s Google Q&A product is in consolidating every important piece of this feature into a single platform. Our product sources data from Google and allows you to receive real-time alerts whenever a question or answer gets posted on your page. This allows you to quickly jump in and answer questions directly as well as set the record straight by correcting wrong answers and flagging inappropriate content.

What are some best practices for using this product?

Broadly speaking, the best way to get the most out of Binary Fountain’s Q&A product is by maintaining awareness and staying engaged with every aspect of the feature. More specifically, you should respond to every single question to provide an authoritative answer for potential customers. You should also anticipate questions users might ask in the future and post them along with the answers to get a head start. All the while, be on the lookout for content that may violate platform rules. Also, treat your Q&A section like your review section by providing clear and concise responses that address the concern, reaffirm your values, and redirect customers to more information.

Are there reporting capabilities, and what does it track?

Yes. Our product will give you a quick snapshot of the total number of Google questions per location/provider, including the number of unanswered questions. This information shows up immediately, which is important seeing as your engagement with Q&A (among other things) impacts your SEO rankings.

Is this a stand-alone product or does it augment an existing product?

This product is integrated with Binary Fountain’s Social Compass and Health Analytics features as an additional source. While it is not a stand-alone product, it does not count against your overall reviews or include Natural Language Processing (NLP). It is simply a response and sourcing tool.

How are existing Binary Fountain clients able to access this?

All Binary Fountain clients can access this feature at no additional charge. They must simply enable it as an additional source in their dashboard.

About the Author

Kayla Zamary
Marketing Manager

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