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April 23, 2019

The 15 Best Reputation Management Resources

By: Alex Hay

Your brand’s growth and success hinges on its reputation. In a digital landscape where consumers can discover and leave feedback across multiple sites, online reputation management is becoming more challenging and important than ever. To get a better grip on the strategies and practices you should employ for your business’s reputation, we have rounded up…

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best reputation managementYour brand’s growth and success hinges on its reputation. In a digital landscape where consumers can discover and leave feedback across multiple sites, online reputation management is becoming more challenging and important than ever.

To get a better grip on the strategies and practices you should employ for your business’s reputation, we have rounded up several blogs, articles, videos and podcasts from relevant sources. Within this roundup, you will discover some of the best reputation management advice available.

The Definitive Guide to Online Reputation Management (Neil Patel)

In this detailed guide, online marketing guru and NYT bestselling author Neil Patel goes over every aspect of online brand reputation management and transparency, from responding to negative reviews the right way, to taking action against defamatory or fraudulent reviews.

7 Ways to Use Social Media for Online Reputation Management (Jason Mudd)

CEO of AXIA, Jason Mudd delivers seven useful tips for leveraging social media platforms to steer the conversation, build community and trust, and encourage customers to leave reviews and personal stories.

The Ultimate Guide to Responding to Positive and Negative Google Reviews [With Examples] (Mor Assouline)

In this short read on Hubspot, Mor Assouline, Practicepanther.com’s VP of Sales, goes over best practices for using Google’s review platform as a business owner, such as setting up review notifications and always responding to both good and bad reviews. He even gives some examples of what these reviews should ideally look like.

Effective Ways to Manage Your Business’s Online Reputation (Steven Scheck)

Steven Scheck, the Principal of Inspire WiFi, the nationwide leader of WiFi networks for the multifamily, hospitality and healthcare industries, lists and delves into six crucial ways to manage your business’s online reputation, including claiming your brand name, monitoring your reputation, responding to all criticism, actively engaging with social media, registering with local directories, and producing high-quality, relevant content.

Video/Blog: Talk Triggers by Jay Baer and Daniel Lemin (A One Win Book Review) (Adam Toporek/Customers that Stick)

In this concise video, customer service expert Adam Toporek reviews the book “Talk Triggers” by Jay Baer and Daniel Lemin, which is about how brands can create word of mouth step by step. Toporek praises the book and reveals his “one win” takeaway: that ‘word of mouth’ is still the best reputation management strategy, one that every business should employ.

TED Talk Video: Why Social Media is Reimagining Our Future (Bryan Kramer)

In this 12-minute Ted Talk, Bryan Kramer, CEO of PureMatter, pushes back against the narrative of social media’s negative influence by exploring the power of sharing and human to human connection, sharing his own story about how social media transformed his brand and his life for the better.

9 Strategies for Personal Branding Online in 2019 (Gary Vaynerchuk)

Online personality, renowned public speaker and marketing entrepreneur, Gary Vaynerchuk reminds readers of the connection between personal brand and reputation, and just how valuable it is to focus on building brand reputation in the long term. This blog post details nine tips for expressing, expanding and enhancing your online personal brand.

How to Build a Positive Reputation Using Social Media (Jonas Sickler/Neal Schaffer)

In this blog, Jason Sickler outlines the importance of social media for online reputation management, and how brands should go about using these platforms to their advantage, such as signing up for all relevant platforms, becoming verified if possible, regularly posting relevant content, responding to messages, posts and reviews, and more.

Podcast: 10 Tips to Protect Your Online Brand (Pam Moore)

In this episode of the Social Zoom Factor, Pam Moore gives listeners advice on how to protect and enhance their online brand. You will hear about the importance of trademarking your brand name, securing web domains and social channels, investing in online security, engaging with your audience, and much more.

Strategies to Handle Negative Posts and Feedback (Wishpond)

This brief and useful blog post gives readers the main dos and don’ts of replying to negative reviews, offering some advice and examples for how to go about responding to such comments in a productive way that may in turn build brand reputation.

Want to Improve Your Social Media Sharing? Harness the Power of Positivity in Social Media (Kevan Lee/Buffer)

In this research-driven article, VP of marketing at Buffer Kevan Lee dives into the ways in which human emotion, namely positivity, drives social media sharing. The post features findings from multiple studies across social media platforms, with the conclusion that positivity ultimately builds brand reputation, encourages social sharing and yields more engaged followers in the long run.

THE HACKIES: Hacking a technology stack for local presence management (ChiefMartec)

Online reputation management depends largely on online presence and visibility, especially at the local level. This detailed article gives readers insight into the importance of data management and maintenance in determining a brand’s visibility and prominence in local searches, its authority in the industry and its ability to acquire and maintain an engaged, loyal customer base.

We Do Not Want to Fit In. We Want to Belong (Chris Brogan)

Author and business advisor Chris Brogan discusses the ways in which consumer culture is shifting from a desire to fit in to a desire to belong. More specifically, Brogan states that people connect more strongly with brands that authentically share their values, meaning brands must focus their attention on smaller, more specific buyer markets and potentially make political statements. As risky as this all sounds, Brogan argues that this is where the culture is heading and that a brand’s reputation is becoming more closely tied to these personalized markets.

Online Reputation Management: A Guide for Social Media Marketers (Social Media Examiner/Sameer Somal)

Sameer Somal, CFO of Blue Ocean Global Technology, writes for Social Media Examiner in this comprehensive guide for social media marketers who manage their brand’s online reputation. Everything is here, from key advice to statistics, images, examples and links to relevant resources that will help you get the most out of social media and review sites as you build your online brand reputation.

The Complete Field Guide to Brand Monitoring (SproutSocial/Jenn Chen)

In this SproutSocial blog, Jenn Chen gives you tips and tools to better monitor your brand’s online presence. Chen specifically says to monitor branded keywords and industry-related trends to keep tabs on your online reputation and stay ahead of the competition. Some of the best ways to do this is by investing in the best reputation management services, sentiment analysis algorithms, customer engagement data and competitor analysis tools.

Can’t Get Enough Reputation Management Tips? Check out these other helpful materials:

Online Reputation Management Vendor Buying Guide

Without the aid of an online reputation management (ORM) vendor, maintaining a positive online reputation can be a challenging task. In this ebook, you can explore the importance of utilizing ORM services and how to choose the right vendor for your company’s needs.

How Reviews Can Help or Hurt Your Search Engine Rankings

Reviews on Google and other review platforms are the leading factors of how people decide to give their business to one company over the other. Because of this, online reviews have proven to be a dominant factor in how companies rank in search engine results.  With this e-book, you can find best practices for generating and managing online reviews where a strong SEO ranking is the end goal.

What is the Voice of the Consumer?

Today’s world is driven by meaningful communication that is instantaneous across digital platforms. Because of this, real-time customer feedback is more important than ever, which is why many companies are investing in Voice of the Customer (VoC) programs.

About the Author

Alex Hay
Content Marketing Specialist

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April 19, 2019

How to Pick Your Online Reputation Management Vendor?

By: Alex Hay

Maintaining a positive reputation is necessary for the continued success of a business. The current digital landscape gives customers and employees plenty of opportunities to rate and review a brand. This is both a blessing and a curse for business owners and marketers, who must navigate all review sites and social media platforms in an…

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Online Reputation Management Vendor Buying Guide: How to Pick a Vendor That’s Right for Your NeedsMaintaining a positive reputation is necessary for the continued success of a business. The current digital landscape gives customers and employees plenty of opportunities to rate and review a brand. This is both a blessing and a curse for business owners and marketers, who must navigate all review sites and social media platforms in an attempt to manage their brand’s reputation.

Without the aid of an online reputation management (ORM) vendor, this can be a challenging task. In this e-book, you can explore the importance of utilizing online reputation management services and how to choose the right vendor for your company’s needs.

That’s why Binary Fountain released a new e-book, “Online Reputation Management Buying Guide: How to Pick a Vendor That’s Right for Your Needs.”

This e-book identifies several tasks that online reputation management vendors should offer you in their packages. These include:

  • Social Media Management
  • Providing Insights from Deep Data Analytics Based on Reviews, Ratings, etc.
  • Strategies for Improving Consumer Engagement and Trust
  • Review Monitoring, Generation and Prioritization
  • Highlighting Positive Online Reviews for Marketing Campaigns, Social Media, Landing Pages, and more.

Within the e-book, you will dive deeper into each of these categories, uncovering why they are all vital to thorough online reputation management for businesses.

The online reputation management solutions listed above are the bare minimum of what a great ORM vendor should provide.

Read the e-book to Learn All of the Criteria needed to properly Choose an ORM Vendor for your needs.

About the Author

Alex Hay
Content Marketing Specialist

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April 19, 2019

The Evolution of Online Transparency

By: Alex Hay

Binary Fountain’s Senior Vice President of Marketing, Aaron Clifford was featured on the “That’s What They Said” podcast from Touch Point Media about how the transparency space has evolved and what is next for hospitals. Aaron provided some additional to context to the 2018 Healthcare Consumer Insight & Digital Engagement Survey that found that 51%…

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online transparency evolution

Binary Fountain’s Senior Vice President of Marketing, Aaron Clifford was featured on the “That’s What They Said” podcast from Touch Point Media about how the transparency space has evolved and what is next for hospitals.

Aaron provided some additional to context to the 2018 Healthcare Consumer Insight & Digital

Engagement Survey that found that 51% of Americans sharing personal healthcare experiences via social media and online ratings and review sites.

“An increase of 31% to 51% from 2017 to 2018 was a massive change,” he says, noting results from the previous year’s study.

Additionally, the study found that 95% of consumers trust online reviews to provide a “somewhat” to “mostly” accurate depiction of what a business is like. “We want to remove as much uncertainty about the experience and treatment as possible, so reviews and ratings are a mechanism to do that.”

You can listen and download the complete podcast episode here.

About the Author

Alex Hay
Content Marketing Specialist

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April 17, 2019

Ask an Expert: How Important Is Review Management for Multifamily Properties?

By: Alex Hay

In this series, Binary Fountain offers its staff expertise to answer common questions about reputation management. In this post, Account Executive Robert Guider tackles questions related to managing reviews for multifamily property managers.   How important is review management for multifamily properties? Robert Guider: Choosing to live somewhere is a major decision, so prospective tenants…

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review management for multifamily propertiesIn this series, Binary Fountain offers its staff expertise to answer common questions about reputation management.

In this post, Account Executive Robert Guider tackles questions related to managing reviews for multifamily property managers.

 

How important is review management for multifamily properties?

Robert Guider: Choosing to live somewhere is a major decision, so prospective tenants pay close attention to the reviews and ratings of the properties they browse. If multifamily properties plan on bringing in more business, they need to maintain positive reviews that reflect their brand reputation.

Of course, it is nearly impossible to regularly read and respond to all reviews across all sites and platforms manually.

Review management services gather and centralize all of this data on a single dashboard. This allows multifamily property managers and owners to easily see every review they receive, respond to them in a timely manner and gather actionable insights to improve their operations and stay ahead of the competition.

How do reviews relate to brand visibility?

The reviews you receive also play a major role in determining where you show up in searches. And it is not just about the quality of reviews (whether they are positive or negative), but also the quantity.

Properties with a higher number of reviews tend to rank higher in search results, bolstering brand promotion and authority. This is why managers should focus on generating a greater volume of online reviews by reminding and incentivizing tenants via survey campaigns and other means.

Can bad reviews and ratings ruin your reputation?

Yes and no–it is really a matter of how proactive you are in dealing with these reviews and how you can leverage them to make necessary operational changes.

Most consumers will expect to find at least a couple of bad reviews wherever they look. What they might not see as often are sincere, detailed responses that reveal a brand’s commitment to improvement and customer satisfaction.

Most people do not care about reviews that are over 120 days old. People understand the  importance of frequency, that management companies change. They know that property managers change, and they know that renovations change properties.

Location and competition matters, too. If you are a luxury building with less than a 4-star rating, you might be in bad shape. But, for a smaller city where there are fewer buildings, this becomes less important.

So, if you are dealing with a legacy of bad reviews, you have some work to do on building brand reputation. But it is not the end of the world.

If you happen to have great reviews, do not get complacent. Somebody might see a 4 or 5 stars and look at your reviews, but if five of the last six comments are negative, they are likely not coming to take a tour.

How should managers respond to negative reviews?

First, do not start an argument. You may be right, but nobody else knows that. While you might win the battle, you will certainly lose the war.

Address the issue he Avoid just spitting out a canned apology like, “We are sorry you had a negative experience. Please call us at this number.” The only exception here is if it is a 1-star review with no comment.

If they do tell you what is wrong, address it. Stay neutral and be specific. If somebody had issues with the maintenance staff being unprofessional, for instance, say something like, “We are really sorry that you had an issue with the maintenance staff not respecting your apartment. That is not something we want our residents to experience. This is something that we will be addressing with our maintenance staff immediately. Please give us a call at this number, or email us at this address if you have anything specific you would like to tell us.”

Prospective renters want to see this behavior. They want to see that an issue is being handled, and that somebody is not just checking a box to say, “Ok, I responded.”

Do not sweat a negative review or two. It will happen. You will never be able to satisfy everyone, in anything.

As long as you are addressing issues as they come up, doing the work to keep them from happening again, getting more positive feedback than negative feedback, and moving things in the right direction, you will maintain a good online reputation.

What about fake, fraudulent or bad faith reviews? How do you find them, and what can you do about them?

Some just stick out right away. Other times, if you are not at the property for which the review was left, you might not know the whole story.

Talk to your property manager, communicate with them, and respond to them in the same way you would any other negative review–even if you know it is fraudulent. You might know the truth, but others will not.

You can also request that a fake or malicious review be taken down by the listing site, like Facebook, etc. But, frankly, if it does not violate their terms of service they probably will not take it down.

Unfortunately, you do not have a lot of control over this, so you have to compensate by drowning it out with positive reviews.

Keep in mind that fake reviews are not tremendously common. Everyone will deal with from time to time, but they are more centered around disputes than outright fraud. You will commonly see someone with a really lengthy, outrageous complaint about their security deposit being taken away, for example.

After speaking with the property manager, they might inform you that the tenant flooded their apartment and everything had to be replaced and fixed, so of course this was the case. In a certain respect, this is a matter of opinion, so you have to treat it that way.

Diffuse the situation as best you can and drown it out with reviews from your happy residents.

What are some advantages of review management services?

One of the largest benefits of competent review management is less pressure. With these services, you don’t have to go look for reviews and you don’t have to chase people down to respond to reviews if that is their job.

At Binary Fountain, we put everything you need to see in one location, saving you a lot of time. Managers who once had to do this all by hand really notice a difference when using our service.

As far as results go, review management services will help you obtain you more reviews while letting you easily see what is negatively impacting resident satisfaction so you can act on it. Our clients have been able to make positive changes that lead to better performance for their properties. This, in turn, will lead to more positive online reviews in the future.

To see part 1 of our Ask an Expert series, click here.

About the Author

Alex Hay
Content Marketing Specialist

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April 11, 2019

How Reputation Management Workflows Help Property Managers Boost Productivity

By: Kayla Zamary

As a multifamily property manager, you have a lot on your plate. You are in charge of everything from setting rent prices to screening potential tenants and maintaining the property’s value. If all of this was not enough, you must also pay close attention to your property’s online reputation. Today, social media platforms and online…

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reputation management workflowsAs a multifamily property manager, you have a lot on your plate. You are in charge of everything from setting rent prices to screening potential tenants and maintaining the property’s value.

If all of this was not enough, you must also pay close attention to your property’s online reputation.

Today, social media platforms and online review sites are the main sources of information for residents. When someone is looking online for a new place to live, they are most likely going to take these online ratings into consideration.

Without a strong online presence, you could lose business and miss opportunities to increase your brand reputation.

But with all the duties property managers must perform, how can you spend enough time managing your online reputation? With so many platforms, reviews and systems, this seems like an impossible task.

Without the help of an efficient reputation management workflow, you simply cannot read every relevant review or respond to every complaint.

Here we will take a look at the differences in the reputation management workflows between a property manager with access to services like Binary Fountain, and one without such access.

A Day in the Life of a Property Manager Without a Reputation Management Workflow

Without the aid of online reputation services, you as a property manager must maintain your online presence manually. The challenge here is twofold.

First, reviews, ratings, comments and postings are not centralized. They are distributed among several platforms like Apartments.com, Rent.com, Zillow, Facebook and Google, just to name a few. Each platform is a distinct system with its own login, terms of service and layout.

Without a reputation management workflow, you must be aware of each platform their property is listed on as well as the best practices for using each one. Even if you master the ins and outs of every platform, you still have to take the time to manually update and monitor each one individually.

The second problem has to do with data analytics. Without a centralized online reputation management plan, all of the data across platforms is siloed.

You cannot easily track words, comments or phrases that commonly occur on various sites. You also have to manually view multiple rating systems to get an idea of their average score.

This is not efficient or helpful in any meaningful way. Ideally, a property manager would want a system that collects all data from all relevant sources and analyzes it to uncover key insights and provide a current overall online rating.

A Day in the Life of a Property Manager With a reputation management workflow

From reading the situation above, the importance of online reputation management services should be clear. But these services are good for more than just gathering data in one place and breaking it all down. They are also a key component of brand promotion.

Property managers who utilize these services can see reviews and ratings from various sources in one central location. This saves plenty of time and effort that would otherwise be spent perusing dozens of websites.

Additionally, this makes it possible for you to respond to every review you receive. Doing so helps you better engage with customers as a property manager while boosting your online presence.

With a stronger online presence, properties can more easily gain a greater number of reviews as well. The more reviews your business receives, the more highly ranked it becomes on search engines and the more likely customers are to trust it.

In other words, reputation management services are also a powerful way to generate more reviews and therefore promote your brand online.

Today, success is closely tied to online reputation and presence. As online reviews continue to increasingly influence customer decisions, online reputation management services become more important for all businesses, especially multifamily property managers.

Without these services, you could potentially fail to keep up with all the reviews you receive, receive fewer reviews, overlook key insights to improve operations and miss out on many opportunities to promote your brand and engage with your customers.

Interested in learning more? Check out these similar topics:

Want a demo? Book one here.

About the Author

Kayla Zamary
Marketing Manager

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April 09, 2019

What is the Voice of the Customer?

By: Alex Hay

Today’s world is driven by meaningful communication that is instantaneous across digital platforms. Because of this, real-time customer feedback is more important than ever, which is why many companies are investing in Voice of the Customer (VoC) programs. Real-time feedback alerts allow you to not just deliver a better consumer experience, but also attract new…

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voice of the customerToday’s world is driven by meaningful communication that is instantaneous across digital platforms. Because of this, real-time customer feedback is more important than ever, which is why many companies are investing in Voice of the Customer (VoC) programs.

Real-time feedback alerts allow you to not just deliver a better consumer experience, but also attract new customers through an increase of positive online reviews.

Before you start a Voice of the Customer campaign, however, there are some important things to consider, including how to implement a program and how to best use the data.

What is the Voice of the Customer (VoC)?

Voice of the Customer refers to an in-depth process of capturing customers’ expectations, preferences and negative feedback.

At their core, Voice of the Customer programs collect and analyze customer insights so you are able to make the necessary changes needed to improve the customer experience. Done right, a Voice of the Customer campaign should increase both consumer loyalty and sales.

Most successful VoC programs are a closed-loop process that allows members of a company to act quickly when customers have a negative experience with the brand.

Why Does the Voice of the Customer Matter?

In a world of immediate gratification, personalization is quickly becoming the expectation rather than a luxury. Consumers demand what they want, how they want it and when they want it.

This means a business has to completely understand what their customers want and how those expectations should be met.

A good VoC program helps businesses understand where the gap is between what their customers want and what their business currently delivers. If you use this feedback constructively, you should be able to provide better customer service or build better products that will help you retain customers.

This customer-centric way of thinking is skating to where the puck is going with customer relationships as expectations continue to climb.

All too often, business or marketers believe they know better than the customer, or at least think they know what their customers want. These organizations design products or services focused on their perceived value rather than what the customer perceives as valuable.

The reality is most of these initiatives fail because they do not have consumers’ desires at their core. Using a VoC program will help you avoid pitfalls like this and take better care of your customers.

Chances are, if you take care of your customers, they will take care of you. If they don’t feel like you are listening to them, they are going to let you know.

Customers Expect You to Listen

Since the invention of online review platforms, consumers have felt empowered to share their opinions about a business online. Sometimes, for the consumer, It can feel like shouting into an endless void because of how many businesses refuse to interact with negative feedback online.

Consumers don’t share their complaints online to undermine your businesses or leave a negative comment for others to read. They expect you to listen to their complaint, act on it and tell them how the problem has been solved.

Here’s one way you can instantly improve your customer experience: don’t be afraid to acknowledge a complaint, promise to fix the situation and remind them you appreciate their business and you hope they are willing to give you another try.

Above-average customer service and responsiveness to their concerns will help you gain their loyalty and drive business success.

Now that you see the value of listening to your customer and how a VoC program works, you are ready to learn how to build a program of your own.

How to Implement a VoC Program

There are five important steps to building a Voice of the Customer campaign:

  1.  Get buy-in across the organization
  2.  Align with business goals
  3.  Listen to customer feedback
  4.  Analyze customer data
  5.  Drive organizational change

By using these five steps, you will be able to completely change your company culture into a customer-centric one.

How to Get Buy-in for a VoC

Jump-starting a customer-centric company culture can’t happen in a vacuum. To establish a successful and scalable program, you need to get buy-in from key leadership figures to ensure maximum impact and ROI.

This means selling the concept to C-suite level leaders who set the tone for their teams.

You will want to make sure they understand that a customer-centric program isn’t just a fancy marketing initiative–it’s a fundamentally new way of thinking. Once they understand this, you can better explain the benefits of listening to your customers in a more proactive way.

Here are some of the key benefits of a VoC program:

  • Reduce customer churn
  • Increase your visibility in search rankings
  • Leverage customer insight in product/service development
  • Meet customer expectations more often
  • Give actionable insights to your operations managers
  • Improve the long-term value of a customer
  • Enhance your online reputation

You will also need to have a clear vision of how the program will work and focus on one goal. Focusing on a singular pain point will help leadership understand what they are buying into and what the expected outcome will be.

Once you’ve established the value of the program, you can start aggressively expanding it to solve more problems. Don’t ask for the resources for a fully mature program before you can even start to crawl. Aim small, miss small.

To be clear, a VoC program is unlikely to succeed without executive buy-in. You will need their influence to help you change the culture of their teams.

If you are able to do that, you are well on your way to improving your customer experience.

Align with Business Goals

One of the fastest ways to get your VoC program off the ground is to focus on aligning your program with the vision of the company. Oftentimes, VoC initiatives are dead on arrival due to poor communication around them.

While you know the value of the program, that doesn’t mean that everyone else does.

Look across the organization to find common problems or mission statements that could be supported by a VoC initiative. Sit with your customer experience/relations teams and listen to what customers are saying about your product or services. This will help you get a better idea of what kind of problems you need to solve for across the enterprise.

Once you have these data points, it’s much easier to sell the vision to both an executive team and the floor employees.

The long-term success of a VoC is dependent on an engaged workforce that is actively trying to perform with a customer-centric mentality.

A fully committed team will also be more willing to collaborate across the company when actionable insights start rolling in that require action from cross-functional teams.

Having alignment on what the goals of the program are and how each area of the company fits into a long-term vision will help your VOC program flourish.

Listen to Customer Feedback

By this point, you have the buy-in from the organization and are ready to implement the program.

The next step is by far the easiest (or maybe the hardest depending on what they are saying): actively listen to what your customers are saying about you online. This is the core of what a VoC is.

Many businesses rely on only one or two channels for customer feedback, which greatly inhibits their ability to measure interactions with customers and get a clear picture of what they need to fix. This can lead to limited visibility into the consumer experience, or worse, lead to misinformed actions.

You want to amass customer feedback from everywhere your customers are talking about your brand.

This includes:

  • Online reviews
  • Social media
  • Phone calls
  • Email
  • Mobile (SMS, App)

You will need a comprehensive method of collecting, monitoring and reporting on customer feedback so you are able to close the feedback loop later. This means you will want a scalable solution that makes keeping track of customer feedback easy across multiple channels and will be able to adapt when how customers leave feedback online changes.

Once you have all the customer feedback you want, it’s time to put those data points to good use.

Analyze Customer Feedback

Before you are able to act on consumer feedback, you have to make sure you have all the right context to make informed decisions. This means performing a deep analysis of information coming in from multiple areas to get a clear view of the issues you need to address to improve the customer experience.

This means designing a thorough reporting system that can help give context for actionable insights to anyone within your organization: from customer experience specialists to executive level leaders.

A good platform will allow you to quickly get a sense of what people are saying about your company and what areas you need to improve on that anyone within the organization will understand.

Another tangible benefit of having the right reporting is the ability to connect employees directly with customer feedback. Having this level of visibility can help your organization find areas for improvement within their department.

This is important because it can help identify:

  • Process inefficiencies
  • Technology limitations
  • Areas for personal development
  • Policy improvements

Most importantly, this visibility can help employees within your organization better understand their impact on your bottom line. This is especially true if you have a lot of employees who experience face-to-face interaction with customers.

Take Action

Once you have examined the data through all the appropriate lenses, it’s time to take action to improve your customer experience. A customer-centric program still needs to deliver ROI for the business, so make sure you are taking action on improvements that will increase revenue.

Start by focusing on small improvements that will have maximum impact on the organization.

These can include:

  • Holes in your marketing funnel
  • An easily fixable problem with a product
  • An issue with your customer service
  • An inefficacy in how you communicate with your customers
  • Poor customer reviews

Once you have some wins, you can start expanding the program to tackle much larger issues within the organization like:

  • Problem employees
  • Data-driven consumer-centric product development
  • Increased market share
  • Reducing overhead costs
  • Customer Lifetime Value (CLV)

Some key indicators that your program is on the right track include

  • Increased NPS
  • Online customer review ratings
  • Customer Satisfaction Scores
  • Patient Satisfaction Survey scores

Ultimately, these KPIs will lead to long term revenue growth for your organization, but you will want to measure your success by tangible value for your organization in ROI.

A Quality Voice of the Customer Program Takes Time

As with any major initiative, systemic change does not happen overnight.

Adopting a consumer-centric way of thinking throughout an organization takes time, patience and adaptability in the face of sometimes hurtful customer feedback. Successful VoC programs take years of iterative innovation to continually improve the consumer experience.

Remember, this isn’t just a new program: it’s a change in company culture.

Are You Ready to Get Started?

If you don’t have the right tool at your disposal, you’re never going to have the kind of feedback loop you need to make informed decisions about how to improve your consumer experience.

At Binary Fountain, we make collecting, analyzing and acting on customer insights easy with a robust, application-focused detailed reporting. You can keep track of all of your consumer feedback in one place, making it easy to make the incremental improvements you need to stay ahead of the competition.

Get insights into your customers’ perspectives with Binary Fountain solutions today by downloading one of our detailed eBooks or requesting a demo. We are here to help you better serve your customers.

Interested in Learning More? Check out these similar topics:

About the Author

Alex Hay
Content Marketing Specialist

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April 04, 2019

How to Get Executive Buy-In for a Reputation Management Program

By: Kayla Zamary

Chances are, if you are visiting our site, you know the value of taking control of your online reputation. The problem is, not everyone in your organization may think the same way you do. In order to sell the idea of listening to the voice of the customer, you need a comprehensive sales plan for…

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reputation management programChances are, if you are visiting our site, you know the value of taking control of your online reputation. The problem is, not everyone in your organization may think the same way you do.

In order to sell the idea of listening to the voice of the customer, you need a comprehensive sales plan for not just your direct leaders, but for the entire company. That means getting executive leadership onboard so they can influence their teams to adopt a customer-focused mindset.

Remember, becoming a customer-centric company requires buy-in at all levels and spans across the entire enterprise. You are aiming for long-term culture change.

We’ve put together some tips on how to get your reputation management program off the ground.

Why Reputation Management is Important

If you are in any service related field, you know consumers are actively using social media and review platforms to give their opinions on everything, from the friendliness of client facing restaurant staff to the quality of care they receive at a hospital.

Online reviews and ratings are a serious matter, as many consumers trust them as much as they would trust a word-of-mouth recommendation from a friend. If consumers are viewing them as a source of truth, your organization should too. Sometimes this means dispelling myths that online reviews are “fake” or that the customer is somehow at fault.

If this is a problem for your organization, you can point them to some of these metrics:

  • 91% of 18-34 year-old consumers trust online reviews as much as personal recommendations.
  • Google only shows businesses with a 4.0 star rating or above when searches include the terms “best” or “top.”
  • If you are in healthcare, 3 out of 4 patients say online reviews influence who they chose as a provider.
  • 37% of consumers won’t use a business with an under 4 star rating.

Now that you have some key statistics and understand why reputation management is important for every organization, we are going to show you how to pitch a reputation management program.

Getting buy-in for any idea from executive level leaders is never easy. It usually requires careful planning, excellent timing and an understanding about what matters most to them.

How to Get Executive Buy-in for Reputation Management

Here are the 4 steps to get buy-in for a reputation management program:

  • Analyze current customer feedback
  • Get alignment with other areas of the company
  • Estimate costs vs ROI
  • Present to key stakeholders

If you want to get a reputation management program started at your company, the way in which you frame your idea will greatly impact the odds of getting it approved. Following these steps will help you set the stage to knock your proposal out of the park.

Analyze Current Customer Feedback

One of the easiest ways to get a reputation management program underway is to take a look at your current customer reviews and gauge what is being said about you online. Are people enjoying your level of customer care? Is your customer support team responding quickly to issues? Do they wish the product came in a different color? Are your office hours listed incorrectly online?

Chances are, there are probably some small opportunities for improvement that you can find that would be easy to implement without a huge ask. Documenting these and either taking care of them yourself (or in tandem with other members of your organization) is the first step to creating a program.

Next, respond back to the customer and let them know that you made the desired change and see if they would be willing to visit your business again and change their review.

Once you’ve done that, measure the success of the change you made. Did your star rating go up? Are sales up after adding another option to your offerings?

Measure these small wins and begin to share them out to your area of influence. This is going to be used later in your executive presentation as an internal use case.

Lastly, set your sights on a larger organizational problem that reputation management could help solve. This shouldn’t be something that will completely change your business model but should be large enough to drive some organizational change.

Get Alignment with Other Areas

Executives like it when cross-functional teams come together to solve a complicated problem that aligns with an overall organizational goal.

This means you need to look at your business’s current priorities and find a way for the reputation management program to become integrated with them. This usually includes looking across the organization and finding another area of the company that could benefit from a closed feedback loop.

You will want to get buy-in from these different areas so you aren’t presenting your idea for a reputation management program in a vacuum. This will only strengthen your case in the eyes of C-suite leaders.

Estimate Costs and ROI

You will also want to find an outside vendor like Binary Fountain to help you with the difficult task of monitoring, analyzing and responding to customer reviews.

This usually means that there will be costs associated with starting a program. You will have to figure out which vendors you want your executive team to review and give them an estimated ROI with each.

Remember, the ultimate goal of a reputation management program is to attract new customers, so weigh that heavily in your calculations.

For example, if you are working for a healthcare organization, the better your online reputation the more likely new patients are to visit your website or call your office. You should have some idea of how much an average patient visit is worth to your organization and estimate accordingly.

Additionally, depending on your practice, you can leverage your high ratings with payers to list you more prominently in their directory, hospitals to refer more to you out of the ER or discharge, urgent cares to get more referrals and simply being recognized as an industry leader. In the future, this could be an important part of improving your CG-CAHPS scores, which could impact your overall reimbursement.

Having a good understanding of your organization’s business model will help you understand the potential impact a reputation management program will have on it.

Present to Stakeholders

Now that you have a plan together, it’s time to take it to the key stakeholders. Before presenting, make sure your timing is right, that your proposal makes sense for what the strategic vision is for your organization and that you have a commonly understood goal.

The best time to present your ideas will be when organizational priorities shift, when a customer review causes unrest within the company or when your executive team is setting global priorities.

You will want to focus your presentation around KPIs that your organization cares about or is focusing on for the year, such as:

  • Reducing customer churn
  • Producing customer-centric products
  • Increasing traffic to your website
  • Increasing customer acquisition

You want to make sure they understand that a reputation management program is a long-term strategy that will continue to grow over time, but you also want to make sure you aren’t asking for the moon right away.

We recommend taking a crawl, walk, run maturation approach.

This means you need to have a clear vision of what problem the program will solve in its first iteration and focus on an easily understood goal. This will help leadership understand how much of an investment they are making and what the expected outcome will be.

Returning to our example of a healthcare organization, patient experience managers would want to ensure all physicians and hospital staff have bought into the reputation management process to inform their performance and their success. If reviews reflect that office staff is not doing enough to help patients get appointments, then management has to take the criticism to heart and make appropriate changes.

The reputation management process is not an easy ordeal, but the actionable insights your team will receive are well worth the effort.

Interested in Learning More? Check out these similar topics:

About the Author

Kayla Zamary
Marketing Manager

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April 02, 2019

What to Do If You’re Only Getting Negative Reviews

By: Alex Hay

Online review platforms give businesses an opportunity to show off their solid reputation, engage with customers and gain valuable insights. However, this opportunity is a double-edged sword. Receiving just one negative review online can throw a wrench in a business’ reputation, especially if it only has a handful of reviews in total. Still, a bad…

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negative reviewsOnline review platforms give businesses an opportunity to show off their solid reputation, engage with customers and gain valuable insights.

However, this opportunity is a double-edged sword. Receiving just one negative review online can throw a wrench in a business’ reputation, especially if it only has a handful of reviews in total.

Still, a bad review here or there is not the end of the world, and most consumers understand that these negative remarks only tell a fraction of the story. On the other hand, if a business is receiving only negative reviews, serious reputation management may be in order.

In the multifamily industry, these online reviews greatly determine the demand for a particular housing unit. While reviews also matter in the food and retail industries, deciding what to eat or wear pales in comparison to the decision to take up residence somewhere.

So, multifamily marketing companies must pay particular attention to online reviews. If you’re in charge of a multifamily provider’s online reputation, what should you do if you’re getting bombarded with negative reviews?

Read the Criticism and Take it Seriously

No matter the circumstance, when we receive criticism we tend to react quickly in anger and defense. We do not want to believe that we made a mistake or did something wrong.

But, as flawed humans, we all make mistakes, and sometimes these errors can result in a bad experience for others. When a tenant leaves a negative review online, the most important thing to do is read it over a few times and try to understand what the reviewer is saying and why.

You might not think that the criticism is justified, but it is not your place to make that judgment. Take the review seriously with an objective stance and try to learn from it.

Use These Insights to Improve Your Operations and Services

The best way to get more positive online reviews and fewer negative ones are to improve your business. And the only way to get better is if you learn from your mistakes.

Receiving multiple negative reviews may be overwhelming, but you may start to notice patterns. Are tenants complaining about similar things? What words or phrases tend to pop up most frequently?

Reading negative online reviews helps you locate these key areas of improvement. In this way, bad reviews serve as a springboard for positive change.

Keep an Eye Out For Fake or Malicious Reviews

While all negative reviews should be read carefully, they are not all legitimate or appropriate. Some reviews will feature offensive language, inaccurate information, or other libelous traits. Bad actors or competitors may send these out to damage your reputation.

Fortunately, most online review platforms feature remediation services for flagging and/or removing these malicious reviews. Each site has different terms of service, however, so it is worth looking into their policies regarding these types of negative reviews.

Respond to Every One

When receiving a negative review, you may either want to respond immediately or not at all. Both approaches are poor online reputation management strategies.

A multifamily company should reply to every review, good or bad. However, you are more likely to come off as harsh and unsympathetic if you react too quickly to a bad review. It is best to wait a day or two before responding, but not much longer.

Responding to every review serves multiple purposes regarding online reputation management. First, it shows onlookers that your company is receptive to all feedback and willing to own its mistakes. Second, it allows you to engage with your customers. And third, it gives you a chance to take some control of the narrative and promote your brand.

Be sure to clearly state what your company is doing to improve and how that relates to its values.

Gather More Reviews

Sometimes, the reason a business receives primarily negative reviews has more to do with numbers more than anything else.

In general, people tend to react more strongly to bad experiences than pleasant ones. So, even if one hundred tenants are satisfied, only a small handful of those might leave feedback.

Conversely, angry customers are more likely to leave a review. This pattern of human behavior can quickly tip the scales against your business.

To help level the playing field or tip the scales in your favor, you might try to gather more reviews. Utilizing reputation management services, you can incentivize all customers to leave feedback by driving them to online review sites and by creating survey campaigns.

Make sure to look into review sites’ best practices for getting more reviews. Not all of these reviews will necessarily be favorable, of course, but you will be able to collect a larger portion of positive online reviews.

Sometimes Bad is Good

No one wants to receive negative reviews. And today, with so many consumers seeking online reviews to make decisions, they can seriously harm your business. Still, there are ways to turn these negatives into positives.

Ultimately, your goal as a multifamily company is to offer the best possible services for your customers. Bad reviews can give you the information to help you achieve this goal, and, in turn, start racking up better reviews along the way.

About the Author

Alex Hay
Content Marketing Specialist

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March 29, 2019

Celebrate National Doctor’s Day with These Helpful Resources

By: Alex Hay

You may not be aware of it, but National Doctor’s Day is coming up on Saturday, March 30 in the United State. It’s a holiday that honors physicians for the work they do for their patients, the communities they work in and for society as a whole. It is their hard work and devotion that…

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national doctor's dayYou may not be aware of it, but National Doctor’s Day is coming up on Saturday, March 30 in the United State.

It’s a holiday that honors physicians for the work they do for their patients, the communities they work in and for society as a whole. It is their hard work and devotion that keeps all of us healthy and this day thanks them for doing that for us and our loved ones.

The holiday can be traced back to March 30, 1933, when Doctor’s Day was first observed in Winder, Georgia. It was conceived by Eudora Brown Almond, the wife of a prominent Georgian doctor, who wanted to recognize and honor the work of doctors everywhere. She decided the best way to do that was to mail greeting cards to all of the doctors she knew of and to place flowers on the graves of deceased physicians. The flowers that she placed on the graves of these doctors were red carnations–a flower which is still used to this day for National Doctor’s Day celebrations.

Binary Fountain works closely with doctors and the healthcare industry at-large, and while we don’t have any red carnations to distribute, we do want to acknowledge the great work of the healthcare providers we serve.

Here are some of the most useful materials for doctors to utilize to improve their service and capabilities:

Webinar: How to Optimize Your Digital Patient Experience

Doctors already know that a good digital patient experience is central to providing patient-centered care. But, knowing what to do and in what order is hard.

If you are struggling with how to improve your patient and consumer experience, join us to learn why digital is now a business problem, not just a digital marketing problem. We’ll give you a practical approach to how you can unify your organization, implement a patient-first vision, and create the change you want to see.

Case Study: KURE Pain Management Improves Online Reviews and Scores by 95% with Digital Patient Surveys

With the help of digital patient surveys, Kure greatly improved their customer service by educating staff members and introducing better processes, which significantly increased patient experience and loyalty. After less than a year, not only did Kure manage to enhance online reviews and scores by 95 percent because of the initiative, but positive reviews increased over 30 percent and patient loyalty increased about 35%.

Read the rest of the case study to see how KURE Pain Management developed these processes to improve doctor-patient relationships and experiences.

E-Book: Building a Healthier Online Reputation

Have you ever Googled yourself? You should.

If you have read things people are saying about you and your practice online, odds are you probably saw something you didn’t love. It’s also highly probable that you weren’t sure what you could do about it.

Online reviews are not only becoming easier for consumers to write, but ratings and review sites are rapidly becoming one of the first places people go to guide their purchasing decisions whether its renting a hotel room, choosing a small appliance or yes, even selecting a physician.

In this brief e-book, we will illustrate how healthcare consumerism needs to change how you think about your business. We will highlight the biggest missed opportunities for your practice when it comes to generating and managing positive reviews. We will show you how to focus on online reputation management and ultimately use ratings and reviews to drive business to your facility.

Blog: SEO for Doctors: How to Show Up in Search Results

With 83% of patients researching online before choosing a healthcare provider, it’s never been more important for healthcare marketers, practice managers and doctors to pay attention to search engine optimization (SEO). SEO for doctors can be complicated, but it is also vital for new patient acquisition.

As a healthcare provider or practice manager, you don’t want to be spending all your time figuring out why Google doesn’t seem to love you. That’s why we’ve put together this comprehensive list of how to win at SEO.

Doctors — Get the Recognition You Deserve!

Get noticed for the great patient experience you provide by implementing reputation management practices.

Let our reputation management experts help your reputation management efforts by giving you the tools you need to improve your reviews online.

Schedule a demo today.

About the Author

Alex Hay
Content Marketing Specialist

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March 28, 2019

How to Make Multifamily Property Listings & Reviews Work for You

By: George LaDue

When searching online for multifamily housing options, the very first thing your customers will find are your business listings and reviews of your properties.   Many property managers understand that first impressions can make or break a business, so they are increasingly utilizing online reputation management strategies to make sure their listings are found easier…

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multifamily property listingsWhen searching online for multifamily housing options, the very first thing your customers will find are your business listings and reviews of your properties.  

Many property managers understand that first impressions can make or break a business, so they are increasingly utilizing online reputation management strategies to make sure their listings are found easier and their reviews truly reflect their brand.

Because your competitors are already successfully implementing these tools, it becomes not a question of “should you invest in reputation management,” but “how can we do it better?”

In our latest webinar, “How to Make Multifamily Property Listings & Reviews Work for You,” we discussed how online listings and reviews impact what potential residents think about your properties, and we covered how property managers can outsmart their competition and bring in more business with critical reputation management practices.

Optimizing for SEO rankings and business listings can grow your customer base and help you meet rental goals

Maximizing your SEO rankings and climbing the Google listings is key to getting your property noticed. In fact, one study from SmartInsights found that the difference of being listed among the top 3 spaces in a Google search changed click-thru rates from nearly 30 percent in the first position to 10 percent in the third position. In the lower positions of 9 to 10, click-thru rates fall to a paltry sub 2 percent.

In addition, it’s important to note that review signals make up about 15 percent of a typical Google My Business local search algorithm. This means that reviews are going a long way to improving your overall SEO ranking, so both need to be taken seriously into account.

When 90 percent of consumers say that reviews influence their day-to-day purchasing decisions, it’s time to stop asking the question “Is reputation management is required to grow my business?” and start asking “How am I going to do this better than my competitors?”

Proactively engaging with residents and managing reputation makes a world of difference—not only to your online rankings but to resident satisfaction as well

Now that we understand why it’s so important to develop a robust listings and reviews strategy, what can multifamily property owners and managers do to make the most of it? We offered insights including:

  • Benchmarking review volume by location — this will allow managers to see which properties need the most attention and can compare results against local competitors
  • Delegate responsibilities or outsource where it makes sense — you can delegate negative reviews to property managers to handle any required fixes and positive reviews to marketing to share online
  • Engage with residents by text message — mobile testimonials have 6 times the response of email and can be sent immediately after a point of contact with a rental agent

Once in place, these reputation management strategies will ease employees workflows and attract the right audience for your organization

In the presentation, we highlighted some clients that have put these best practices into action and found significant success:

Client A implemented listings and SEO strategies to influence and attract new residents to their properties. This company buys and sells properties frequently and didn’t have in-house bandwidth to take ownership of all GMB listings and optimize for SEO.

After 90-days of implementing listings solutions, Client A:

  • Increased total search volume 11.3 percent
  • Increased total Google My Business clicks 22.7 percent
  • Increased clicks for navigation to properties by 12.9 percent
  • Increased clicks for phone contacts by 28 percent

Client B implemented reputation management strategies in response to low review volume and negative comments. This client has a small marketing team managing reviews for more than 100 properties across the U.S. They wanted to boost review numbers across the board to generate interest, and respond to reviews for every location using the same brand voice.

After one year of implementing Social Compass and review management solutions, Client B:

  • Increased experience score 3.7 percent
  • Increased response rates 72 percent

Want to learn more?

Watch the on-demand webinar or contact us for a demonstration.

About the Author

George LaDue
Sales Director

George helps healthcare organizations better understand their healthcare consumer challenges and needs, in order to efficiently manage and improve patient satisfaction.

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