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March 20, 2020

Checklist for Managing Your Online Reputation During the COVID-19 Crisis

By: Kieran McQuilkin

Even though fear and misinformation can spread quickly online – particularly quickly with COVID-19 – there are steps you can take to effectively manage your online presence and defend your business’s reputation. As coronavirus spreads throughout the U.S., it’s more important than ever for you to be the source of truth for concerned customers. The quicker you respond to any problems under your control, the better positioned you…

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coronavirus-covid19-online-reputationEven though fear and misinformation can spread quickly online – particularly quickly with COVID-19 – there are steps you can take to effectively manage your online presence and defend your business’s reputation.

As coronavirus spreads throughout the U.S., it’s more important than ever for you to be the source of truth for concerned customers. The quicker you respond to any problems under your control, the better positioned you will be to contain this crisis.

Here are five steps you can take to manage your online reputation during this health emergency, by informing your customers and protecting your brand.

1. Update Your Listings and Hours

Take the time to check on your listings across Google, social media, review sites and other platforms. Across almost all industries, the four main Google ranking signals remain consistent: name, categories, website URL and Google reviews.

Keep your listings updated with any changed hours, service suspensions or revised contact information for each department or location. To assist on listings with business closures and revised hours, Google CEO Sandar Pichai recently announced Google Search and Maps will show if a place or a business is temporarily closed.

Check your Google My Business dashboard to make sure customers are clicking through to the correct website or landing page, depending on your products or services. It’s also important during this crisis to remove inaccurate business listings wherever they arise, to avoid any confusion and to establish your brand as an authority for information or treatment.

For a full breakdown of steps toward managing your listings during the COVID-19 health crisis, read this checklist.

2. Monitor Reviews About COVID-19 and Respond with Empathy

Even during times of crisis, your customers are talking about your business online. This valuable feedback can offer insights into the consumer’s point of view and can reveal adjustments needed for your business operations as you navigate this challenging time.

To stay informed of what customers are saying across all your locations, it is best to implement a comprehensive review response strategy, if you do not have one in place. Adjust your response techniques as needed, remembering to reply calmly and transparently during the COVID-19 pandemic. Ensure your team has corporate-approved, templated responses that they can adjust quickly as circumstances change while ensuring brand continuity across your communications.

If you neglect to respond to your reviews in a timely manner, you risk hurting your brand’s credibility and damaging trust, which comes at a premium during an emergency. In industries like healthcare, where you can’t respond to some reviews online without breaching patient confidentiality, create a strategy to take the conversation offline.

Take the opportunity to guide commenters to the correct department or point of contact – doing so will help resolve their problem and inform future consumers with similar inquiries.

In a recent blog post, we dive into what consumers and caregivers are saying online, and how organizations can respond.

3. Engage Customers Across Platforms

Amid constant concerns and questions surrounding COVID-19, businesses of all kinds are receiving an influx of questions on the local level.

Prepare to answer these questions on Google Q&A and other platforms with the timely and accurate information that consumers are looking for. If you don’t have too many locations to keep track of, you can set up email alerts for new questions on Google Q&A. If you have dozens of locations, you might consider using a listings management vendor or software solution.

In addition to FAQs on third-party directories, make sure to update your physician profile pages to make sure searchers are aware of your providers’ specialties, services and hours.

4. Join the Social Media Conversation Around COVID-19

Does your social media policy include a crisis communications component? Marketing departments should outline roles and responsibilities, steps to follow, communication channels, emergency contacts and social media log-in details to stay prepared.

It’s crucial to understand your audience and the social media platforms they are using to communicate about COVID-19. Be prepared to respond to negative reviews or comments, and stay consistent with your messaging across all social media platforms. Organizations should also consider pinning a coronavirus announcement or link to the top of their profiles.

You can use social media to engage consumers in short, frequent communications, and also to humanize your business operations. Before engaging, make sure to update and optimize business pages on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram and other platforms.

5. Publish Educational, Informative Content

Control the online narrative by publishing hyperlocal, informative content to your website and third-party listings. Your local landing pages are valuable resources for customers to learn important information regarding each location. They should be updated frequently as circumstances change throughout the crisis response.

Your business should also consider publishing Google Posts and other short content with recent announcements and relevant information, such as links to CDC and WHO information about coronavirus. These posts may include corporate messaging, limited product availability, or special services that are of critical importance to the public.

Here are some tips on keeping Google fed with content that educates and informs your communities, which in turn builds your online reputation during the COVID-19 crisis.

We wish you and your teams the best during this critical moment for the healthcare industry. We are here to help your customer experience teams and marketing operations with anything you need, so please reach out with any questions or concerns.

 

Note: Join our upcoming webinar on Thursday, March 26 for information on the online conversation surrounding COVID-19 and how healthcare organizations can respond. Register here.

Read more on managing your online reputation during the COVID-19 crisis:

About the Author

Kieran McQuilkin
Content Marketing Specialist

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March 20, 2020

How to Optimize Facebook Business Pages for Healthcare Providers

By: Kieran McQuilkin

Facebook is one of the most powerful marketing platforms out there. Hundreds of thousands of businesses across the world use their Facebook business page to connect with potential customers and show up in local search results. Unfortunately, many great healthcare providers have Facebook business pages that are inactive, incomplete, or inaccurate. This can be frustrating…

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binary-fountain-facebook-social-mediaFacebook is one of the most powerful marketing platforms out there. Hundreds of thousands of businesses across the world use their Facebook business page to connect with potential customers and show up in local search results.

Unfortunately, many great healthcare providers have Facebook business pages that are inactive, incomplete, or inaccurate. This can be frustrating for patients who find incorrect hours on your Facebook page, or worse, can lead potential patients to choose another healthcare provider, simply because their social media profiles were more helpful.

If you have a Facebook page for your practice but are disappointed with it, or find it’s not working for you, don’t worry. We’re going to show you how to optimize a healthcare provider Facebook business page so your practice’s profile stands out from the others and correctly informs consumers.

In this post, you’ll learn how to:

  • Make sure your Facebook page information is correct
  • Create and organize multiple location pages
  • Post trustworthy content
  • Show your practice is more than just a business
  • Monitor and respond to reviews on Facebook

1. Make sure your Facebook information is correct

First, check that your information is up-to-date and accurate, especially your practice’s name, address, phone number, website and hours of operation. You’d be surprised how many businesses have posted wrong hours or misnamed their practice, simply because they didn’t check carefully.

Next, make sure your Facebook is complete, which means you should have all the following:

  • Profile picture (at least 180 x 180 pixels)
  • Cover photo (at least 820 x 312 pixels)
  • Custom URL (facebook.com/yourpractice)
  • A link to your website
  • Your company’s NAP: name, address and phone number
  • Hours of operation
  • A detailed business description
  • Your other social media accounts

2. Make pages for your locations

While your practice should have one primary Facebook page (your “parent” page), if you have multiple locations, don’t lump them into one Facebook business page. Each facility may have different hours or services, they probably have different addresses, and for the sake of reviews, you’re better off separating them.

Besides, Facebook makes creating location pages easy. When you’re setting up page for the first time, Facebook will recognize you have multiple sites and a warning message will pop up. You’ll then have the chance to create individual pages for each of your locations.

Just like your primary page, your location pages should have the following:

  • Business name (include location name, too)
  • NAP: name, address, phone number
  • Hours of operation
  • Profile picture (at least 180 x 180 pixels)
  • Cover photo (at least 820 x 312 pixels)
  • Custom URL (facebook.com/yourpractice-location)
  • A link to the location’s website or your main website
  • Email address
  • A detailed business description
  • Your other social media accounts

It can be tempting to copy and paste descriptions from your parent page to all the location pages. Don’t do this! Keep your pages fresh and distinguishable by writing original descriptions for each location.

3. Post content that builds trust

Once you have a Facebook business page that represents your practice, you need to populate it with content that’s relevant and helpful to your patients.

The key here is relevant and helpful, not self-promotional and sales-y. Your patients aren’t checking Facebook for advertisements. In fact, they pretty much hate them. If your content doesn’t engage them in the first few seconds, it will get lost in their newsfeed.

So how do you create content that’s engaging?

Here are some things you could post:

  • Articles, especially ones that you’ve written on topics that interest your patients.
  • Answers to your patients’ frequently asked questions.
  • Health advice, such as how to avoid seasonal allergies or how to prevent certain injuries.
  • Open-ended questions that invite consumers into a larger discussion.
  • Posts about community events or fundraisers that you’re sponsoring or participating in.
  • Inspiring stories from patients who have recovered, or their families (be sure to get the patient’s consent before posting).

4. Show people you’re not just a business

Your practice has more stories floating around than a bookstore, and when you share these on Facebook, you and your audience will connect emotionally.

To do this, post photos of your non-medical facilities, your staff and (with their consent) your patients. These don’t have to be serious, nor does your staff have to look stoic. Show your audience what you do after work hours and the community events you participate in, or give shout-outs to employees who are performing well.

Another great way to humanize your practice (and impress Facebook’s newsfeed algorithm) is by posting videos. These don’t have to be professional videos: You can use your smartphone for a walk-through of your practice, for example. The key to video is to make your practice look inviting: You want potential patients to know what your staff and facilities are like before they walk into the building.

5. Respond to reviews on your Facebook page

Facebook isn’t meant to be a one-sided conversation: If you’re doing it right, your patients will respond to your posts. Sometimes, they’ll respond positively; other times they’ll give you a piece of their mind. No matter what responses you get, always respond to them.

Yes, that means you’ll have to respond to negative reviews. Conflict is tough, but when you empathize with your customer’s concerns and offer solutions, you build trust, which will help you attract new patients.

Binary Fountain can help you manage Facebook reviews

The conversation on Facebook and other social media significantly impacts your practice’s online reputation, for better or for worse. At Binary Fountain, we have a solution that helps practices monitor their mentions on major social media platforms and publish messages across them simultaneously. Control the narrative – check out our Social Media Management tools or click below to schedule a quick demo.

Here are some related posts you might want to check out:

Schedule a Demo

 

About the Author

Kieran McQuilkin
Content Marketing Specialist

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March 19, 2020

Webinar Recap: 5 Updates to Google My Business Impacting Digital Marketers

By: Kieran McQuilkin

How are the latest Google My Business updates impacting your business? It’s not easy for digital marketers to stay informed on SEO trends shaping their reputation in the eyes of the world’s largest search engine. To break down the current Google landscape and how best to optimize your listings, we brought together Hannah Borchik, customer…

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Google My Business logoHow are the latest Google My Business updates impacting your business?

It’s not easy for digital marketers to stay informed on SEO trends shaping their reputation in the eyes of the world’s largest search engine.

To break down the current Google landscape and how best to optimize your listings, we brought together Hannah Borchik, customer success manager at Binary Fountain; Joy Hawkins, owner of Sterling Sky Inc.; and Emma Cook, digital media manager at Gene B. Glick Company.

For our latest webinar, they gathered for a discussion about the attributes of Google search and Google My Business that digital marketers should focus on heavily in 2020.

Here are some of the topics they covered:

  • How to optimize Google My Business features, including zero-click searches, local 3-packs and the Google Knowledge Panel.
  • Using other attributes of Google My Business and Google search that are gaining importance in 2020.
  • Finding opportunities for online reputation growth through local search and SEO.

Here are some key takeaways:

On Google My Business Trends and No-Click Searches

Over 50% of searches result in a zero-click search, meaning consumers use the information provided on the search engine results page (SERP) instead of clicking through to a website. This means having your information listed on Google My Business, in addition to your business website, is essential to your search strategy.

Google My Business (GMB) has been launching many features to give users more information directly in the search results. Although we still see the website and backlinks as the main factors for ranking, the first impression someone gets about your business is incredibly important.

Your GMB listings are meant for customers early in the sales cycle, and should be used to create awareness, increase exposure and share information that will impact prospects during their research phase.

On Crucial Information for Your Google My Business Profile

Across almost all industries, the four main ranking signals remain consistent: name, categories, website URL and Google reviews (both the volume of reviews and their content).

The most important part of establishing or optimizing your GMB profile is the categories you pick. Focus on choosing the most accurate primary category and add additional categories to build out your profile – this is the main factor deciding where you rank. Categories attract users and provide general information, then CTA buttons nudge them in the right direction to take action. Provide the clearest CTA possible, such as “get this offer” or “sign up,” instead of vague directions like “learn more.”

Publishing photos on GMB varies in importance depending on your industry – Gene B. Glick’s photos of multifamily properties get thousands of views, but the same won’t apply for insurance companies or lawyers. Upload high-resolution photos of your business from both the corporate and local levels, along with other hyperlocal content like Google Posts. When your company has multiple locations, like property managers or restaurant chains, users want to know what the local facility looks like, not the logo or corporate headquarters.

On Monitoring Your Local Search Rankings and Ongoing SEO Management

Monitoring Google Q&A is very important to any company, and it’s a missed opportunity if someone posts a question that goes unanswered. If you don’t have too many accounts to keep track of, you can set up email alerts for new questions on Google Q&A. If you have dozens of locations, you might consider using a listings management vendor or software solution.

All three panelists recommend responding to every Google review, unless there is no comment attached to it. Users that leave reviews get an email alert when you post a response, making it a useful tool for retention and service recovery. In industries like healthcare, where you can’t respond to some reviews online without breaching patient confidentiality, create a strategy to take the conversation offline. Generally, having more reviews will boost your click-through rate over time and increase your local search rankings.

For ongoing management of your GMB profile, pay close attention to the Actions section of your GMB dashboard. These statistics track when someone calls, gets directions to your facility or clicks to your website, giving you insight into how customers engage with your business listings and which CTAs lead to conversions.

For more insights and advice, click here to watch the on-demand webinar.

For more on Google My Business updates, check out these resources:

About the Author

Kieran McQuilkin
Content Marketing Specialist

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March 17, 2020

Coronavirus and Your Listings Management Program: A 5 Item Checklist

By: Kieran McQuilkin

In a few short weeks, the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has created significant concern as it continues to spread throughout the U.S. The health crisis is causing disruptions for people in their personal lives and in their companies, with illnesses, remote work policies, closures and changes in day-to-day operations. How can your enterprise business effectively navigate…

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listings-managementIn a few short weeks, the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has created significant concern as it continues to spread throughout the U.S. The health crisis is causing disruptions for people in their personal lives and in their companies, with illnesses, remote work policies, closures and changes in day-to-day operations.

How can your enterprise business effectively navigate this emergency and tailor your local marketing efforts in an unpredictable environment? To stay ahead in local search and inform consumers, your business must properly manage its local listings.

Proper listings management starts with ensuring your Google My Business (GMB) profile provides accurate, updated information to your customers. The updates you make to your GMB profile will display on your business profile on Google Search and Maps.

To help you manage the arrival of this health crisis, we’ve compiled a list of five tips to ensure you’re providing consumers with accurate information – which grows more valuable by the minute.

1. Update Your Facility Hours

When a health emergency occurs in a community, such as COVID-19, it’s not uncommon for office hours or service areas to be affected in the impacted region. Your business may be closed down completely or you may have to adjust hours of operation. If you don’t communicate these updates to potential consumers, you risk not only losing their business, but potentially adding to the spread of misinformation and confusion that already poses a threat. In fact, 93% of consumers say they are frustrated by incorrect information they find in online directories. Provide the most relevant, up-to-date information and avoid tarnishing your business’ credibility by keeping your facility’s hours updated in your GMB listings, especially during times of crisis.

2. Revise Your Phone Number

As COVID-19 continues to sweep across the globe, many businesses have temporarily shut down some of their operations. For these businesses, like healthcare organizations and property managers, simply revising their office hours on GMB is not sufficient. If the business hasn’t updated their phone number to redirect to a home or mobile number when part of the business has suspended services, consumers who try to contact the number listed on Google will be surprised to find they aren’t able to reach anyone. Update your phone numbers if they’ve changed to ensure customers are able to get in touch with your business and to further crisis-proof your local listings.

3. Update Your Business Description

In situations where a natural disaster or health crisis is potentially impacting businesses across the globe, Google recommends explaining whether your business operations are affected by the emergency or not. Additionally, Google recommends “sharing information about any extra precautions” your business is taking, such as providing any extra services to the community or if you’re experiencing delays. More information on how to edit your business description can be found here.

4. Create a Google Post

Google Posts allow you to share detailed and timely updates about what’s going on with your business, which may be beneficial when patients, tenants or other consumers need current information. You may want to add more information about the services you have available, and link to other resources. Google Posts should be updated on a regular basis as your business changes. To get the most out of your Google Posts, we recommend reading our guide to useful Google My Business features.

5. Monitor Your Google Q&A

Customers use the questions and answers section on your Google Maps listings to communicate with you. During times of crisis, they turn to Google Q&A more than ever to ask if your business will be open, if hours are affected, or if certain services are available. Be sure to proactively monitor and quickly respond to these questions. However, Google Q&A (along with Google Reviews) has been temporarily suspended due to staff shortages, according to the company.

It’s important to keep your customers up-to-date with accurate, timely information to ensure they’re aware of any changes in your business operations, whether you’re impacted by a health crisis, like COVID-19, or simply updating your holiday hours. This is especially important if your hours of operation or wait times are affected, you have an update to available services, or change your phone number. If any of the aforementioned are affected, Google wants you to make your customers aware of these changes. By doing so, you build trust with your customers, become the voice of authority, and strengthen your relationship with your customers, all of which encourage loyalty.

Additionally, due to a large number of businesses affected by COVID-19, Google recently released a new help document that describes how businesses can update their local listings.

Customers expect updated information on your business at all times and want to know they can trust the information they receive. With the average consumer conducting between 3-4 Google searches a day, it is now more important than ever to crisis-proof your local listings to be the source of truth for your business.

For more on what consumers are saying online about the coronavirus outbreak and how Binary Fountain can help, check out this blog post.

About the Author

Kieran McQuilkin
Content Marketing Specialist

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March 16, 2020

Webinar Recap: The Key Metrics of Online Reputation Management 

By: Kieran McQuilkin

Everyone knows a healthy online reputation is valuable to successful businesses. But how valuable is it, exactly? Binary Fountain leaders Aaron Clifford, Andrew Rainey and Chase Ausley tackle that question every day for clients. For our latest webinar, they gathered for a roundtable discussion about the return on investment (ROI) for online reputation management (ORM). The trio talked about the competitive…

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metrics-reputation-managementEveryone knows a healthy online reputation is valuable to successful businesses. But how valuable is it, exactly?

Binary Fountain leaders Aaron Clifford, Andrew Rainey and Chase Ausley tackle that question every day for clients. For our latest webinar, they gathered for a roundtable discussion about the return on investment (ROI) for online reputation management (ORM).

The trio talked about the competitive landscape, setting goals, key metrics to analyze and other contributors to ROI that will help you get the most out of your online reputation.

Here are some of the questions they cover:

  • What are the key metrics for my enterprise-wide reputation management strategy, and what is their impact on my bottom line?
  • How do I connect online reputation metrics to business objectives when seeking executive buy-in?
  • How do I measure ongoing success for my healthcare company’s investment in reputation management? How do I calculate ROI?

Here are some key takeaways:

On how to frame your thinking about what to invest in ORM:

There are three main categories you should consider from the outset: Your current website metrics and online presence, the patient experience (which dictates the feedback you get online), and how you manage patient feedback. If you’re improving the areas within those categories that are subpar, it will be reflected online and it could improve patient acquisition.

Equally important to tracking those metrics is identifying team leads who will manage the project. That includes buy-in at the health system level, but also applies to the business’ executive leadership, who would be benefiting from an ORM program.

On the key metrics to track for your enterprise-wide ORM strategy:

Some of the important metrics are obvious: When you search for your brand online, where do you show up? Even with five-star ratings across all your facilities, if you don’t show up on search, you don’t exist to the consumer. The volume of reviews and recency of reviews are important signals for guiding consumer behavior and choice – apply those trends to your healthcare organization.

It’s also critical to understand where patients are looking when they require care, and to have a healthy presence on all those sites. When shopping on Amazon, consumers are more confident in a product with star ratings than those without. Today, consumers have the same viewpoint when searching for healthcare.

On attracting buy-in or budget for a new strategic initiative:

The critical mass of the healthcare market has realized that reputation management is simply a cost of doing business. Everyone must invest in ORM to some degree – the question is where you invest and where you don’t.

Most importantly, it’s critical to understand how different variables affect the volume of net new patients and loyalty from existing patients. Many different inputs contribute, such as online presence, digital accessibility and star ratings. If you have laid out your success metrics before launching your program, there will be no surprises: You already baked in the program’s alignment with business objectives.

On connecting reputation management to revenue generation:

Especially in healthcare, knowing service line revenue is vital. Choose the most valuable service lines and the health system’s goals for those services, focus on those service lines, and report those results frequently.

Choose your participating providers wisely, too. It’s challenging for healthcare organizations to market providers who are at maximum patient capacity. While it’s important to have coverage for loyalty, your ORM strategy should focus more on physicians with the capacity to bring in more patients. Otherwise, you won’t see the lift in new patient revenue.

For more insights and advice, click here to watch the on-demand webinar. 

For more on the ROI of reputation management, check out these articles:

About the Author

Kieran McQuilkin
Content Marketing Specialist

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March 13, 2020

Coronavirus: What Consumers, Patients, and Caregivers are Saying Online and How Healthcare Organizations Can Respond

By: Kieran McQuilkin

In this article, you will learn:  Where consumers are posting online about coronavirus and frequently asked questions  What consumers are saying about healthcare organizations related to COVID-19  How to monitor patient feedback and social media for coronavirus-related mentions of your brand  The emergence and spread of coronavirus is weighing heavily on the healthcare industry, as care providers scramble to answer a flood of questions from patients and community…

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coronavirus-map-march
A map of U.S. coronavirus cases as of March 13, 2020. Credit: CSSE at JHU

In this article, you will learn: 

  • Where consumers are posting online about coronavirus and frequently asked questions 
  • What consumers are saying about healthcare organizations related to COVID-19 
  • How to monitor patient feedback and social media for coronavirus-related mentions of your brand 

The emergence and spread of coronavirus is weighing heavily on the healthcare industry, as care providers scramble to answer a flood of questions from patients and community members. 

As a consumer experience and patient feedback management platform, we know those questions are coming quickly and from many directions. To help you navigate this difficult situation, we hope to provide resources and tools to keep your business operating smoothly. 

In this article, we will offer guidance on what consumers are saying about coronavirus and how to use the Binary Fountain platform to update the public with key information. To do so, we collected data on common coronavirus inquiries and consumer feedback and outlined steps toward providing a quality consumer experience and protecting your brand during this crisis. 

What Healthcare Consumers Are Saying About Coronavirus Online 

Search terms, social media posts and patient feedback mentioning coronavirus (COVID-19) are spiking, with comments and questions about potential symptoms, preventative measures, where the virus is spreading and where to find care in a worst-case scenario. 

When considering which feedback platforms to monitor, start with Twitter. Binary Fountain clients using Binary Health Analytics have amassed thousands of mentions of the virus connected to their brand on the social media site (including retweets). As the newsiest of the social media giants, Twitter topics related to coronavirus most frequently involve notifications about new cases, community updates from healthcare providers and links to informational content. 

Meanwhile, healthcare organizations using Binary Fountain’s Social Listening tool have been mentioned alongside coronavirus in hundreds of Facebook comments and posts on Facebook business profiles. The most common Facebook mentions of the virus include questions about providers’ preparedness, provider reviews about flu-like symptom treatment, and concerns about process changes brought on by facilities’ preventative measures. 

They aren’t all bad: One children’s hospital received a Facebook comment in which grandparents of someone who recovered from coronavirus thanked the organization for treating their grandsonOther frequent comments on Facebook offer prevention advice, share news articles and link to resources like the CDC coronavirus site. 

While those are the most popular platforms in terms of COVID-19 mentions, you should also check third-party review sites and Google listingsThey attract fewer comments related to the virus, but for Binary Fountain clients, most of those messages are more detailed – mostly describing patient experiences while being examined for flu-like symptoms. 

Using Binary Fountain to Track Coronavirus Mentions 

Hospitals and clinics across the U.S. will benefit from monitoring reviews, surveys and other feedback for mentions of coronavirus paired with their brand. To manage the flood of information, healthcare organizations are using consumer experience technologies like Binary Fountain to help automate and streamline that process. 

On the Binary Health Analytics dashboard, healthcare organizations can filter their patient feedback across all platforms using specific keywords like “coronavirus symptoms, “COVID-19” and “coronaviridae.” With patients expecting swift answers from their local providers, technology platforms are allowing these organizations to instantly qualm consumers’ worries, no matter where nor how they express those concerns. 

Mentions of COVID-19 on Google reviews and Google Q&A are less frequent than on social media. However, anticipating questions from consumers and posting them to those listings can prevent an influx of FAQs and save time for your staff. If consumers have already asked questions about coronavirus on your Google My Business listings, respond quickly and empathetically to their concerns. 

Our healthcare clients are seeing increased feedback about changed operating hours, updated service offerings and closed facilities due to precautionary measures. If you need to close locations, temporarily suspend specific services or make other changes, you can update your facilities’ data inside the Binary Health Analytics platform so updates flow immediately to any listings powered by Binary Fountain 

Your organization should also closely monitor social media mentions and post proactive messages on social media, keeping the public aware of the situation at your facilities and in the community. Binary Fountain’s Social Media Management tools are being used by healthcare organizations ttrack mentions of coronavirus in relation to their brandpublish informational posts across all their social media profiles, and respond to comments and reviews in real-time. 

Here is an example of a helpful social media post distributed by a healthcare brand across multiple platforms:  

[Healthcare organization] is screening for the 2019 coronavirus (COVID-19) at all sites. If you suspect that you or someone in your family may be at risk for coronavirus, we ask that you wear a mask prior to entering a [healthcare organization] site to help ensure patient safety. Masks can be found at the entrance of each location. Learn more below.” 

More Healthcare Resources for COVID-19 Preparation 

Though much is still unknown about COVID-19, its transmission dynamics, and its treatments, there are numerous resources available to stay well informed. 

The World Health Organization (WHO)  has assembled several resources around the topic of coronavirus, which you can find here. It also developed free online training courses for healthcare workers and created checklists for provider risk communications and community engagement. 

The CDC suggests a cautious approach to persons under investigation (PUI) for COVID-19, recommending that healthcare personnel evaluating PUI or providing care for patients with confirmed COVID-19 should use Standard Precautions, Contact Precautions, Airborne Precautions, and use eye protection. Providers should also consult with local or state health departments to determine whether patients meet criteria for a PUI, and should immediately notify infection control personnel at their facility if they suspect the virus in a patient. You can find more CDC coronavirus information here. 

In addition to the WHO and CDC resources, Johns Hopkins created an interactive map that tracks (in real-time) the spread of coronavirus in the U.S. and globally. 

We wish you and your teams the best during this critical moment for the healthcare industryWe are here to help your patient experience teams and marketing operations with anything you need, so please reach out with any questions or concerns.

About the Author

Kieran McQuilkin
Content Marketing Specialist

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March 12, 2020

Top Healthcare Marketing Newsletters and Blogs for Busy Medical Professionals

By: Kieran McQuilkin

Healthcare marketing is busy work. With large brand reputations and sensitive medical information on the line, there’s little time left to stay on top of news and trends that influence perceptions of your brand. Though the medical marketing industry constantly changes – whether it’s Google algorithms, Facebook ad policies or best practices for video –…

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binary-fountain-healthcare-marketing-newslettersHealthcare marketing is busy work. With large brand reputations and sensitive medical information on the line, there’s little time left to stay on top of news and trends that influence perceptions of your brand.

Though the medical marketing industry constantly changes – whether it’s Google algorithms, Facebook ad policies or best practices for video – the information is out there. To keep your content, campaigns and messaging on point, and sent through the right channels, you need updated information on search trends and patient feedback.

If you’re looking for how-to’s, industry insights, or that small dose of inspiration to write your next blog post or tweet, we’re here to help. Here are some of the best healthcare marketing newsletters and blogs that every medical marketer should read.

Becker’s Hospital Review, Becker’s

For up-to-date information on the healthcare industry and changing regulations, Becker’s Hospital Review is a mainstay. Becker’s offers several publications and newsletters to supply the news you need, including weekly emails devoted to business and legal news, CFO reports, and infection control and patient experience.

PX Weekly, The Beryl Institute

The Beryl Institute’s Patient Experience Weekly publication shares newsworthy events, resources and information designed to inform your work in the healthcare industry. It aims to be a leading resource for ongoing learning for patient experience professionals and healthcare leaders. The Beryl Institute’s periodic emails also announce new white papers, new issues of its Patient Experience Journal and event-specific communications for PX gatherings around the U.S.

MM&M Weekly Digest, Medical Marketing and Media

MM&M delivers a consistent roundup of the week’s big stories, hires and other developments in healthcare marketing, along with its own special reports. The timely editorial content is aimed at an executive audience in pharmaceuticals, medical devices and diagnostics, along with the industry at large. MM&M also produces annual lists like the Top 40 Healthcare Transformers and the Hall of Femme, as well as surveys with data on industry salaries and marketing trends.

Healthcare Success Marketing Advisor, Healthcare Success

The Healthcare Success Marketing Advisor newsletter does not fall short of information, with high-level topics that relate to the healthcare economy. As a healthcare marketing and medical advertising agency, Healthcare Success focuses its publications on growing your hospital or physician practice. Subscribing to the newsletter also grants you access to a useful ebook: “How to Avoid the 7 Deadly Sins of Healthcare Marketing.”

TPS Report, Touch Point Media

For a dose of video in your market research, check out the TPS Report newsletter from Touch Point Media. The podcast publishing company focuses exclusively on healthcare, with several shows on the topic, including “The Connected Hospital” and “Power of the Patient.” Every week, Touch Point sends an email with links to articles that inspire its shows and their hosts, along with industry news and recent podcast episodes.

Socialease, Health Care Social Media

Every week, public relations practitioner Marie Ennis-O’Connor sends a list of the latest social media news to help healthcare-focused marketing specialists stay up to date with industry-specific social media marketing. Ennis-O’Connor’s resume and writing style make her a must-read for the industry’s social media managers – she serves on the external advisory board of the Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media, and on the board of trustees for the Patient Empowerment Foundation.

Health Care Communication News, Ragan

Ragan’s Health Care Communication News is one of the leading publishers regarding communication for healthcare professionals. It delivers news and strategies to promote and publicize your providers through immersive storytelling. Ragan also provides frequent information on internal communications for healthcare organizations, including viewpoints from both marketing experts and patients. Topics on the site run the gamut, from basic marketing tips to data analytics and HIPAA compliance.

HIMSS News, Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society

With a laser-focus on marketing in health technology, the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) is among the premier health IT information sources. The blog stays on top of technological disruptions across the industry, covering emerging solutions for challenges like interoperability, optimizing care delivery and organizational change.

TotalCom Blog, TotalCom Marketing Communications

Alabama-based marketing agency TotalCom Marketing Communications has a knack for finding healthcare clients, giving its blog deep insights into understandable, replicable use cases. Though it’s only updated about once a month, the blog provides case studies and real-world examples of top-notch healthcare marketing in many forms, with topics ranging from breast cancer awareness to rebranding strategies to award announcements.

99MGMT, 99 Healthcare Management

Healthcare management group Ninety Nine Management helps physicians practice medicine independently with increased net revenue, making it a great resource for smaller healthcare operations and individual providers. The blog provides content surrounding practice management, marketing and business growth, with a focus on growing your practice and bottom-line results.

Carevoyance Monthly Digest, Carevoyance

The Carevoyance blog has helpful advice on healthcare marketing strategies, but also keeps readers abreast of technology and industry news. You’ll find posts on several topics, from artificial intelligence in healthcare and geographic targeting to email marketing tips and medical sales cycles.

KevinMD, MedPage Today

Founded in 2004 by Kevin Pho, KevinMD is one of the most popular publications for medical professionals looking to upgrade their online presence. The platform is more democratic than most resources on this list, with physicians, advanced practitioners, nurses, medical students and patients all sharing insights and telling their stories. Though topics range in scope, KevinMD is especially useful for clinicians looking to manage their online reputation, expand their social media know-how or prepare a keynote speech.

Daily Digest, MedCityNews

With information on innovation in healthcare, MedCity News does well to cover timely topics before they find the mainstream. In its publications, you’ll find breaking news alongside business analysis, policy papers and profiles of people that are pushing boundaries in the healthcare industry. A portion of MedCity News content focuses specifically on MedTech for technologically savvy providers and practice managers.

Digital Pulse, Trajectory

As a well-known wellness marketing agency in the Mid-Atlantic, Trajectory specializes in content surrounding branding and content marketing. With coverage on market research, thought leadership and technology, the Digital Pulse blog has resources that can help push your marketing campaigns through the dreaded writer’s block.

Reputation Roundup, Binary Fountain

Get the latest updates on online reputation strategies and listings management from Binary Fountain’s email newsletter. Every three weeks, we’ll send you a list of recent blog posts, case studies and ebooks focused on the world of healthcare marketing. We’ll also let you know about upcoming webinars that you won’t want to miss.

Looking for more healthcare marketing content? Look no further than Binary Fountain’s constantly updated blog posts, case studies and ebooks.

About the Author

Kieran McQuilkin
Content Marketing Specialist

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March 03, 2020

How to Optimize Physician Profile Pages

By: Kieran McQuilkin

With most patients now playing a more active role in their healthcare, physician profile pages or listings are often the first touchpoint on their path to choosing a provider. If you are a practice manager or healthcare marketer, you know how difficult it is to manage physician profile listings online, from Google and Facebook to Healthgrades and…

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physician-profile-pagesWith most patients now playing a more active role in their healthcare, physician profile pages or listings are often the first touchpoint on their path to choosing a provider.

If you are a practice manager or healthcare marketer, you know how difficult it is to manage physician profile listings online, from Google and Facebook to Healthgrades and Wellness.com and more. While these listings are tedious to manage, they play an important role in your provider’s online personal brand.

In addition to third-party review sites, many practices know that creating their own physician profile pages on their website can give your practice a competitive advantage when a patient is choosing a doctor.

If you want to know how to build a high-converting physician profile page, you’ve come to the right place. We’ll walk you through how to optimize physician pages, and in doing so, attract more patients to your practice.

The Basics of a Physician Profile Page

When it comes to physician profile pages, consumers are really trying to answer three questions:

  • Does this physician have the right expertise I need for the highest level of care?
  • Can I contact or get an appointment with this doctor?
  • Can I trust this doctor?

A good physician profile page should answer these questions and be easy to navigate.

To start, you will need to make sure you are covering the physician’s specialty, their previous experience and any accolades they have received.

From there, you will also want to include contact information for the practice and an option to book an appointment online (if your facility offers it). If a doctor is not taking on new patients, you should do the patient (and your front office) a favor by declaring that on the doctor’s profile page. That way, you don’t waste anyone’s time trying to schedule an appointment that won’t happen in the near future. Insert a link to your full physician listings to keep users on your website.

If you can, humanize the physician by including their interests, hobbies or why they chose to be a caregiver. Additionally, use any kinds of photo or video content you can to build the physician up as someone who patients can relate to on a personal level.

Finally, and most importantly, you will want to include verified online reviews on the physician’s page.

Why Star Ratings/Reviews Matter Most

According to BrightLocal, 58% of consumers say that star rating is the most significant factor in them choosing a business. Why? Because according to the same survey, 84% of consumers trust online reviews as much as a personal referral.

Star ratings also matter significantly for your local SEO game, as Google won’t even consider displaying a business in queries containing “best [service/product] in [location],” unless it has a 4-star rating or higher.

A well written review also helps put into context why someone gave that a physician a certain star rating.

In general, patients are looking for these factors when looking at physician profile pages:

  • Number of patient reviews
  • Recency of reviews
  • Overall star rating
  • Bedside manner

If you are creating a physician profile page on your site, make sure you are incorporating physician reviews.

Transparency Matters

When it comes to third-party provider review sites like Healthgrades, Vitals and ZocDoc, it’s important to take all reviews at face value, even the most negative ones. These sites invest significant time in verifying the integrity of their reviewers to ensure the best experience for users and for healthcare providers.

Resist the urge to challenge negative reviews – patients want to see both the positives and negatives about your healthcare providers in order to make an informed decision about their healthcare. Remember: all reviews matter.

Showing verified customer reviews on your physician pages creates transparency and builds trust with potential patients before they visit your location. You won’t regret giving people the clarity they need to select the right healthcare provider for them.

Physician Profile Pages are a Part of Online Reputation Management

Now that you know how to build a great physician profile page, it’s time to get serious about your practice’s online reputation. Designing great profile pages is only the first step to building a great brand online.

At Binary Fountain, we understand how difficult it is to manage and maintain business listings and customer reviews in so many different places. Our reputation management software is perfectly suited for practices because all of your reviews and star ratings can now live in one place.

Our system gives healthcare marketers and practice managers the full picture of what consumers are saying about their practice and providers, all in one unified dashboard.

If you are serious about increasing transparency and patient acquisition, sign up for a free demo or view one of our case studies to learn more about how we can help you grow your business.

About the Author

Kieran McQuilkin
Content Marketing Specialist

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February 28, 2020

Ask an Expert: How to Protect Your Healthcare Company From a Data Breach

By: Kieran McQuilkin

Few things are more personal than health information, and it’s up to healthcare organizations to protect patients from a data breach by keeping it secure. In the digital age, that is easier said than done.  The medical world continues to grapple with stories of stolen data, ransomware and other security threats to health systems. There is…

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data-breach-securityFew things are more personal than health information, and it’s up to healthcare organizations to protect patients from a data breach by keeping it secure. In the digital age, that is easier said than done. 

The medical world continues to grapple with stories of stolen data, ransomware and other security threats to health systems. There is no magic bullet to preventing security breaches, especially with millions of data points stored and transferred electronically. But there are proven tools and processes that minimize your company’s vulnerability.

We asked Mark Beckmeyer, Binary Fountain’s director of IT security, how healthcare organizations can protect themselves from a data breach. Here is his advice:

What implications does a healthcare privacy breach have, that differentiates it from other industries? 

In the black market, protected health information is vastly more valuable than other highly targeted information. The last time I looked, it was about a $20 to $1 ratio – for every $1 you get for credit card information you get $20 for medical information about a person.

One of the reasons it’s so valuable is the personal nature of it, and because financial information can be easily remedied. If your credit card is stolen it could be deactivated right away. Whereas with medical information and PHI, that information is nearly impossible to purge from the black market and, thus, has a much longer shelf life due to its long-lasting usefulness in nefarious schemes.

What are the biggest mistakes healthcare enterprises make with storing and/or transferring protected data? 

The biggest mistake is not knowing where data is internally stored and where and how PHI is being exchanged with other organizations. One of the biggest issues I came across in hospital organizations was senior management lacking knowledge about where their PHI was being used within their environment. It’s essential for those in any data-using roles, from patient experience to accounting to marketing, to know all avenues by which information comes in and out of the organization – and with whom it is shared.

What steps can I take right now to evaluate the security of my organization’s information?

To minimize the possibility of a data breach, the first step is to fully understand the sensitive nature of data that your organization uses or stores. I want to understand how we’re getting information, and if I know it will have PHI in it, is it from a partner of ours or a client? Is this data we’re cultivating ourselves?

The second step is to identify all potential risks to the organization and, third, to test existing safeguards to understand what needs to be fixed. All applicable privacy standards (especially HIPAA) need to be addressed enterprise-wide as well, along with industry best practices for using health data. These steps must be periodically repeated, so all departments across the organization are on board with a risk management program.

Mark Beckmeyer
Mark Beckmeyer

How do I make sure corporate partners and vendors are protecting patient data? 

Understanding the nature of information shared with a partner, such as technology vendors or marketing agencies, will dictate the level of due diligence needed to ensure the appropriate level of protection.

“If the company’s leaders and executive management aren’t committed to security, who in the organization will be?”

If PHI is to be exchanged, the organization must conduct a thorough security assessment of the partner to ensure they are capable of protecting such information. As with your own risk management program, the external entities’ security assessment should be conducted periodically. That requires all departments to keep management abreast of data-sharing partnerships, to make sure they meet certain standards for information security.

How can I best protect my healthcare organization’s data from being lost or stolen? 

Defense and depth. You should look at applying security at multiple layers throughout the environment, from simple card key access on doors and alarms to laptops with access controls, encrypted hard drives, and a comprehensive set of policies and procedures that govern the security program.

Likely the biggest threat for healthcare firms is on the human-error side of security. You can have the best set of policies in the world, but if you don’t train your workforce and can’t push out reminders of procedures, that’s where the biggest threats can occur. The case-in-point is ransomware: One person clicks an attachment and all a sudden it runs rampant throughout your network.

What are the first steps I should take after discovering a privacy breach? 

If a security-related event could jeopardize the protection of the organization’s sensitive information, the first step is communicating it quickly to security teams, who will try to isolate it from other parts of the network. The next thing is to fully understand how much data was exposed, how the incident occurred and how to remediate its root cause.

A very important consideration is to keep senior management informed of the incident status – they play key roles during and after the incident. Such roles include notifications to clients, responding to media inquiries, damage control and government reporting.

If you could give one piece of advice to a healthcare executive worried about their data security, what would it be? 

Make a commitment. Get the right people in there with the experience and skillsets to do what needs to be done. It will take time and effort, cost money and require following additional security policies, but make that commitment and stand by that commitment. If the company’s leaders and executive management aren’t committed to security, who in the organization will be?

Another overarching bit of advice I would give – and this is important – is to not be satisfied with just compliance. No matter your role at a healthcare firm, don’t just stop at HIPAA compliance. Understand, embrace and go boldly into the realm of best practices for security and privacy.

Read more about healthcare data and crisis response:

Want to learn more about how Binary Fountain can improve your online reputation?

Schedule a Demo

 

About the Author

Kieran McQuilkin
Content Marketing Specialist

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February 27, 2020

Keys to a Winning Strategy for Local Listings Management [Infographic]

By: Kieran McQuilkin

How important are local listings for multi-location businesses?  When people conduct an online search, they are often looking for nearby options first and foremost. About 33% of consumers use search engines to find local businesses every day. And 50% of Google searches have local intent. Simply put, it means your enterprise needs a strong local…

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local-listings-infographic
Click to view full infographic.

How important are local listings for multi-location businesses? 

When people conduct an online search, they are often looking for nearby options first and foremost. About 33% of consumers use search engines to find local businesses every day. And 50% of Google searches have local intent.

Simply put, it means your enterprise needs a strong local listings strategy. Whether in-house, manually updating listings or through a vendor, every organization with multiple locations should focus on listings management as a main tenet of their marketing.

Consumers use local search in order to make purchase decisions, and your online listings are their front door.

Check out our local listings infographic for eye-opening statistics on the importance of managing them correctly.

Click here to view the full local listings infographic.

Want to learn more about how Binary Fountain can improve your online reputation?

Schedule a Demo

 

About the Author

Kieran McQuilkin
Content Marketing Specialist

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